cost effectiveness

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cost effectiveness

the achievement of maximum provision of a good or service from given quantities of resource inputs. Cost effectiveness is often established as an objective when organizations have a given level of expenditure available to them and are seeking to provide the maximum amount of service in a situation where service outputs cannot be valued in money terms (e.g. the UK National Health Service). Where it is possible to estimate the money value of outputs as well as inputs, then COST-BENEFIT techniques can be applied. See VALUE FOR MONEY AUDIT.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The probability of treatment with each regimen was derived from the Turkish Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Screening in Breast Cancer, with pharmacy costs for all interventions, follow up and mammograms were taken from the SGK Appendixes.
Health gains and financial risk protection afforded by public financing of selected interventions in Ethiopia: an extended cost-effectiveness analysis. Lancet Glob Health.
Moreover, the results showed that cost-effectiveness analysis is the most common method for economic evaluation in published articles.
The cost-effectiveness analysis supports evaluation of costs and consequences of a treatment, program or health care policy, making it complete on evaluation among one or more alternatives (Drummond et al., 1987)--it is usually used because it has as outcome unit both monetary and clinical benefits.
Using the empirical DPP/DPPOS data [16], the 10-year cost-effectiveness analysis estimated that metformin overwhelmed the control group with direct medical cost of care, and the ICER for lifestyle intervention compared to control group was $10,037 per QALYs gained.
After outlining a method for applying cost-effectiveness analysis to higher education, I apply the approach to a variety of well-known programs, ranging from financial aid to student services and alternative modes of instruction.
To identify CUAs of cancer prevention in Canada in the context of the cancer control continuum, we searched the Tufts Medical Center Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry for studies published between 1976 and 2011 using the key words "malignant neoplasms" and "Canada" in the "disease" and "country of study" categories.
While gross pathologic analysis may seem like the next best alternative to putting every specimen under the microscope, incremental cost-effectiveness analysis reveals that it is the worst option.
[19] about the prospective Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Cetuximab in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.