Cost-benefit ratio

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Cost-benefit ratio

The net present value of an investment divided by the investment's initial cost. Also called the profitability index.

Cost-Benefit Ratio

A ratio of whether or not and how much profit will result from an investment. It is calculated by taking the net present value of expected future cash flows from the investment and dividing by the investment's original cost. A ratio above one indicates that the investment will be profitable while a ratio below one means that it will not. A cost-benefit ratio is also called a profitability index.
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Cost benefit ratio of each treatment and their combination was calculated (Table IV).
Cost benefit ratio and profit (%) over control: Bunches covered with polythene bags expressed significantly the highest cost benefit ratio (1:34) fetching the maximum profit (67%) over control.
It is concluded from the results that the highest biological, cane yield, total income and cost benefit ratio was obtained in the sole sugarcane crop.
Key words: Sugarcane, NPK nutrients, Fertilizers levels, Yield parameters, Yield, CCS%, Sugar yield and Cost benefit ratio.
Cost benefit ratio (CBR) was calculated to fine out the best treatment, showing maximum control of the pest and resulting in maximum yield with a minimum cost.
Since the collapse of the scheme in November, 2005, there have been many changes which could strengthen Merseyside's case: not least Everton FC's proposed ground move to Kirkby - served by Line One - which has improved the original cost benefit ratio.
The present studies were carried out at Bhalwal areas to study the efficacy of widely used insecticides (Basudin 60 EC and Furadan 3G) in comparison with Trichogramma chilonis and calculate cost benefit ratio for the treatments.
The cost benefit ratio of the scheme is now understood to stand at 2:1 (pounds 2 of benefit for each pound spent), which was better than when it was first proposed in 2004.
Assistant Professor, Division of Biostatistics proposes to examine the cost benefit ratio of traditionally taught and computer added learning of letter recognition in preschoolers.
As regards cost benefit ratio, the highest ratio was received in case of rice-lentil (1:2.
The cost benefit ratio was maximum in case of biosal followed by natural enemies as compared to the application of synthetic insecticides.