Democracy

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Democracy

Self-rule in a polity. In a democracy, the citizens vote on issues of governance. Often, the term also refers to a republic, in which citizens elect representatives who vote on issues of governance, but the two terms are not identical.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The aims of the cosmopolitan democracy project have never been limited to academic discourse.
At the same time, though, she remained remarkably true to the original cosmopolitan skepticism as to "man." Her deep reflections on Nuremberg, on the revolutionary idea of "crimes against humanity," and on what she preferred to call the "human condition" in general, (16) led her to conclude that "the organized attempt to 'eradicate the concept of human being' and bring about a 'total moral collapse' might well succeed." (17) Furthermore, if we take Rainer Baubock's word for it, Arendt also provided a critique for the very idea of cosmopolitan democracy, arguing that democratic citizenship is possible only in an environment where clearly demarcated communities coexist.
Thinking beyond his earlier preoccupation with the constitutional contours to cosmopolitan democracy, Archibugi argues the case for a cosmopolitical project.
Cosmopolitan democracy represents system-building at its most formal, ambitious, and encompassing.
(84.) Daniele Archibugi, "Cosmopolitan Democracy and Its Critics: A Review," European Journal of International Relations 10, no.
Established theoretical proposals for the construction of "cosmopolitan democracy" (1) are commonly criticized for providing underspecified institutional proposals and for lacking pragmatic recognition of real-world institutional constraints.
For recent restatements, see Daniele Archibugi, "From the United Nations to Cosmopolitan Democracy," in Daniele Archibugi and David Held, eds., Cosmopolitan Democracy (Cambridge: Polity Press, 1995); David Held, Democracy and the Global Order (Cambridge: Polity Press, 1995); Richard Falk and Andrew Strauss, "On the Creation of a Global Peoples Assembly: Legitimacy and the Power of Popular Sovereignty," Stanford Journal of International Law 36, no.
The Global Commonwealth of Citizens: Toward Cosmopolitan Democracy, Daniele Archibugi (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2008), 320 pp., $30 cloth.
Rather, Bohrnan's reluctance seems to stem from his analysis that there is no global demos, and that post-national democracy must therefore be a transnational democracy of demoi, rather than a cosmopolitan democracy that organizes a demos.
The challenge of globalization has mainly been viewed as a problem of extending the existing democratic model (cosmopolitan democracy) or of finding ways to compensate for its absence (discursive democracy).
While he overfly denies any blueprint for the future, Booth sets out a range of features for his preferred cosmopolitan democracy that bear a marked similarity to white lines on a blue page.
David Held's proposal for "cosmopolitan democracy" calls for a complex scheme of "multi-layered" democratic governance and an enforceable system of global public law.