correlation

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Correlation

Statistical measure of the degree to which the movements of two variables (stock/option/convertible prices or returns) are related. See: Correlation coefficient.

correlation

The relationship between two variables during a period of time, especially one that shows a close match between the variables' movements. For example, all utility stocks tend to have a high degree of correlation because their share prices are influenced by the same forces. Conversely, gold stock price movements are not closely correlated with utility stock price movements because the two are influenced by very different factors. The concept of correlation is frequently used in portfolio analysis. See also serial correlation.

Correlation.

In investment terms, correlation is the extent to which the values of different types of investments move in tandem with one another in response to changing economic and market conditions.

Correlation is measured on a scale of - 1 to +1. Investments with a correlation of + 0.5 or more tend to rise and fall in value at the same time. Investments with a negative correlation of - 0.5 to - 1 are more likely to gain or lose value in opposing cycles.

correlation

a statistical term that describes the degree of association between two variables. When two variables tend to change together, then they are said to be correlated, and the extent to which they are correlated is measured by means of the CORRELATION COEFFICIENT.

correlation

A former appraisal term, replaced by reconciliation.
References in periodicals archive ?
2005) for more information on using correlational research to identify other evidence-based predictors.
I was surprised to see in Science News, conclusions about causation made on the basis of correlational research ("Keep on Going: Busy seniors live longer, more proof that it pays to stay active" SN: 7/15/06, p.
In addition to this correlational research, a number of studies have explored the relationship of spirituality, religion, and career development qualitatively.
Correlational research investigates relationships between two variables, such as height and weight and answers the question, "What is the relationship between--and--?
We expected this outcome because 29% of the studies coded used correlational research designs involving multiple regression.
Although the results of such correlational research do not imply causation, Ogunseitan notes, they can offer insights to guide future research.
The present article proposes some quality indicators for evaluating correlational research in efforts to inform evidence-based practice.