Corporate bonds


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Related to Corporate bonds: Municipal bonds

Corporate bonds

Corporate Bond

Debt securities issued by a for-profit company instead of a government. Corporate bonds are a major way companies raise funds for their operations or for a specific project. The risk of a corporate bond for a bondholder depends on the creditworthiness of the issuing company. As with all bonds, corporate bonds have a maturity, at which time the principal is repaid to bondholders. They also usually have a stated coupon rate. Corporate bonds are taxable.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fund management arm of Legal & General is urging investors to 'play safe' by buying corporate bonds as an alternative to wasting their ISA allowance altogether.
Eaton Vance Income Fund of Boston (EVIBX) and Vanguard High-Yield Corporate Bond Fund (VWEHX) have received the highest ratings from Morningstar.
Claymore BulletShares Corporate Bond ETFs offer investors benefits relative to investing in individual corporate bonds and most other fixed income investment products including immediate diversification, exchange-traded liquidity, professional management, and access to corporate bonds that may otherwise be unavailable.
Christian Katz, division CEO of Swiss Exchange said, "With the new electronic trading platform for corporate bonds, we are creating a regulated market that will benefit not only market professionals but also provide greater efficiency for their clients, in other words pension funds and asset managers .
2% of the total issuance of corporate bonds together.
Many PEP investors, nervous that the stock market is looking dangerously high, are putting their money into corporate bond PEPs in the hope of getting a higher tax-free income for much less risk than with a unit trust PEP invested in shares.
Name: PIMCO Low Duration Euro Corporate Bond Source UCITS ETF, Asset class: active bond index ETF, ISIN: IE00BP9F2J32, Total expense ratio: 0.
3 billion of corporate bonds to mature in five years and NT$10.
However, available data demonstrate that most municipal sectors have superior recovery prospects to corporate bonds, which have an average recovery rate of about 40%.
A total of 24 new issues have already been listed in the Entry Standard for corporate bonds this year.
CPC recently issued secured corporate bonds totaling NT$17 billion to mature in five, seven and 10 years, making it the first issue of such bonds by the state-run oil refiner this year.
Rodgers adds that mom-and-pop investors should stay away from lower-rated corporate bonds and purchase securities issued by solid blue-chip companies such as AT&T (NYSE: T) and Ford Motor Co.

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