Corporate Veil


Also found in: Legal.

Corporate Veil

The legal separation of a corporation from its shareholders. That is, because of the corporate veil, shareholders are not responsible for paying the debts of the corporation (beyond the level of their own investment) and generally are not legally liable for any crimes the corporation might commit. While the corporate veil protects shareholders, it may be disregarded under certain circumstances, notably if a shareholder assisted the corporation in the commission of a crime. See also: Piercing the corporate veil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Plaintiffs can seek to pierce the corporate veil even when the corporation did not seek to defraud its creditors.
The Article will next focus more fully on the theories that allow for piercing the corporate veil.
And it was not until less than a year ago that China recognized one of the most important (and most often litigated) corporate law doctrines: piercing the corporate veil.
Piercing the corporate veil is thus proper and the respondents may all be held liable,' it added.
The issue of press freedom stuck out as the SEC decision came after President Rodrigo Duterte warned in his State of the Nation Address in July that the administration would pierce the corporate veil of Rappler, a constant critic, to expose the American financing behind it.
The owner(s) are not liable for the acts of the (form of business entity) unless there is a piercing of the corporate veil.
These methods include traditional agency principles of tort law, piercing of the corporate veil, and inducement principles outlined in [section] 271(b) of the Patent Act.
The protection of client secrecy is often stronger than authorities' ability to pierce the corporate veil to pursue an investigation.
Piercing the Corporate Veil to Assert Personal Jurisdiction
was even possible for a court to pierce the corporate veil in the
1) The separation of a legally organized entity from its owner and the prohibition of piercing the corporate veil, absent proof that the entity was organized or used to mislead creditors or to work a fraud on them, has been Florida's common law for decades.
Readers will find the latest news with a twist: an unflinching look at what is really being said and done behind the corporate veil.

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