copyright

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Copyright

The right to distribute, copy, or change an original work for a limited period of time. A state grants copyright to the creator of the work, but the creator may assign or sell the right. During the time the copyright persists, one must (with some exceptions) receive permission from the owner to publish or distribute the copyrighted material. After a certain period of time, any person may distribute the work without permission. See also: Public domain.

copyright

the legal ownership by persons or businesses of certain kinds of material, in particular original literary, dramatic, musical and artistic work; sound recordings, films, broadcasts and cable programmes; the typographical arrangement or layout of a published edition; and computer programs. In the UK, the COPYRIGHT, DESIGNS AND PATENTS ACT 1988 gives legal rights to the creators of copyright material so that they can control the various ways in which their work may be exploited. Copyright protection is automatic and there is no registration or other formality The 1988 Act gives copyright owners protection against unauthorized copying of such material in most cases for a period of 50 years. If copyright is infringed, the copyright owner (or assignee or licensee) may seek an injunction through the courts preventing further abuses, with offenders liable to pay unlimited damages/ fines and prison sentences in extreme cases. See BRAND.

copyright

the ownership of the rights to a publication of a book, manual, newspaper, etc., giving legal entitlement and powers of redress against theft and unauthorized publication or copying. See INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT.

Copyright

The exclusive legal right to sell, reproduce, or publish a literary, musical, or artistic work.
References in periodicals archive ?
"However, due to lack of awareness regarding the copyright laws in Pakistan, we are lagging behind in enforcement and commercial exploitation of the copyright work.
Unhappy to pay royalties for something from which their terrestrial radio counterparts were exempt, digital broadcasters such as Pandora, Spotify and Sirius XM took the position that digital broadcasters had to pay public performance licensing fees only for recordings protected under federal copyright law i.e., recordings made after Feb.
In spite of the complexity of Section 110(2)'s composition, it's an important, yet underappreciated, part of copyright law. In essence, it allows a class at a not-for-profit school instituting legally compliant copyright policies to stream a portion of a film, so long as the streaming media technology used reasonably restricts access to students in the class and prevents them from making redistributable copies of the video.
Courses are designed to help users understand global copyright law and licensing issues.
With the range of concerns expressed, some are hopeful the full EU parliament will debate and then dump the new copyright law altogether before it takes effect in 2021.
The post Confusion surrounds enforcement of copyright laws appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
He spoke about copyright law clashing with the flow of knowledge--for example, some photos of public landmarks can't be added to Wikipedia entries.
In copyright law, copying is wrongful only because it interferes with a creator's legally promised market for her expression, thereby potentially reducing the inducement to create future work.
"This dissertation argues that copyright law is still important to encourage and reward creativity.
Under the Copyright Law, the copyright owner may request the customs authority to seize any infringing products provided that evidence of the possible infringement is provided along with adequate details to enable customs to reasonably detect infringing products.
Obama's speech is protected by copyright law. One might question whether the speech was a federal work and thus part of the public domain, but since Mrs.
ABS argued that simply converting analog versions of the songs into digital recordings was a "mechanical" function with no creativity attached to the effort, meaning the songs essentially were originals dating to before the 1972 federal copyright laws kicked in and therefore were subject to state law.

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