copyright

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Copyright

The right to distribute, copy, or change an original work for a limited period of time. A state grants copyright to the creator of the work, but the creator may assign or sell the right. During the time the copyright persists, one must (with some exceptions) receive permission from the owner to publish or distribute the copyrighted material. After a certain period of time, any person may distribute the work without permission. See also: Public domain.

copyright

the legal ownership by persons or businesses of certain kinds of material, in particular original literary, dramatic, musical and artistic work; sound recordings, films, broadcasts and cable programmes; the typographical arrangement or layout of a published edition; and computer programs. In the UK, the COPYRIGHT, DESIGNS AND PATENTS ACT 1988 gives legal rights to the creators of copyright material so that they can control the various ways in which their work may be exploited. Copyright protection is automatic and there is no registration or other formality The 1988 Act gives copyright owners protection against unauthorized copying of such material in most cases for a period of 50 years. If copyright is infringed, the copyright owner (or assignee or licensee) may seek an injunction through the courts preventing further abuses, with offenders liable to pay unlimited damages/ fines and prison sentences in extreme cases. See BRAND.

copyright

the ownership of the rights to a publication of a book, manual, newspaper, etc., giving legal entitlement and powers of redress against theft and unauthorized publication or copying. See INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT.

Copyright

The exclusive legal right to sell, reproduce, or publish a literary, musical, or artistic work.
References in periodicals archive ?
Failure to respect copyright infringes on the legal rights of the copyright holder, and could put you and your organization at risk.
"Under the current provisions of Section 115, music users need to give notice to each copyright holder before they make use of the musical composition, and regularly pay the royalties to those copyright holders," Oxenford states.
YouTube, Google and virtually every pirate site on the internet invokes the DMCA, over and over, to avoid prosecution for hosting content without permission from the copyright holder. Google received about 2 million takedown notices every day in 2016, according to the Silicon Valley Business Journal.
The court held that the DMCA requires Copyright holders to consider whether the potentially infringing material was fair use before issuing a takedown notice.
All of this would be completely in compliance with the agreements our platform has with a number of large copyright holders.
The court added that "a copyright holder's consideration of fair use need not be searching or intensive" in order to avoid this liability, noting that it may be possible to use computer algorithms, combined with human review, to conduct this evaluation.
Instead, they reduced the question to whether the copyright holder asserted that it licensed rather than sold its software.
(8) In contrast, if the copyright holder specifically objects,
Unfortunately for copyright holders, the Supreme Court shredded that statutory provision in its recent decision in Kirtsaeng v.
Therefore we need to get permission from the copyright holder to listen to music broadcast on radios, CDs, computer speakers, if music is played for customers as well as our staff.
provide the certificate that confirms the validity of a contract between an importer and a copyright holder or a licensee and that is