coin

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coin

the metallic CURRENCY that forms part of a country's MONEY SUPPLY.Various metals have been used for coinage purposes. Formerly, gold and silver were commonly used but these have now been replaced in most countries by copper, brass and nickel. Coins in the main constitute the ‘low value’ part of the money supply See MINT, LEGAL TENDER.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
I have argued elsewhere that the small copper coins found in the Sakra region served primarily as votive currency, and also may have facilitated petty transactions within a cluster of sacred sites in the highlands en route from Gandhara to Udyana, modern-day Swat.
PLANS to safeguard the future of cash - from copper coins to larger banknotes - have been set out by the Government.
understands that the two copper coins are likely to be saved by a Treasury review, which is expected towards the end of this week, into the use of different types of cash in the economy.
The Chancellor was considering scrapping the copper coins but will this week announce he is relenting in the face of furious opposition.
A spokesperson told the Gazette that the thieves smashed their way into all the rooms in the club house, stealing food and drink from the kitchen and around PS20-PS30 in silver and copper coins in the till.
In November last year, Copper coins, which may date back to the Kushan period, were found from the site.
The confiscated archeological pieces included gold, bronze and copper coins, in addition to pottery and glass pieces, stone stamp seals, and jewelries.
The "unofficial" copper coins, or tokens, represented farthings, halfpennies and pennies, and a dozen from the North East have been sold by London specialist auctioneers DNW for a total of PS3,770.
She gives to the temple treasury her two copper coins that she needs to survive the day.
A panel reads, "Between 6th century BCE and 1st century CE, merchant guilds and royal families used punch-marked silver and copper coins all over India.
Sheep farmers pay a symbolic charge in acknowledgement of a 1418 agreement with the city council that set a fee of 50 maravedis -- medieval copper coins -- per 1,000 sheep brought through the central Sol square and Gran Via street.