Contractual Claim

Contractual Claim

An amount that by legal agreement must be paid periodically to the buyer of a security; contractual claim may also specify the time at which the principal must be repaid and other details.

Contractual Claim

An amount to which one party of a contract is entitled. For example, if two parties agree to transfer a security in exchange for a fee, that fee is the contractual claim.
References in periodicals archive ?
The worker has no legal, contractual claim on any return at all.
2-million payment came as settlement of a larger contractual claim for $7 million filed by DAI against USAID for incurred expenses related to the arrest and incarceration of Gross.
The San Francisco-based 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals disagreed with the judge, reviving the lawsuit in a July 2012 ruling on the basis that Ginsberg's contractual claim was unrelated to the price, route or service.
By the time the defects became apparent the limitation period for a contractual claim had expired.
This question of jurisdiction depended on three primary, though related, inquiries: (1) whether the language of art XI admitted such claims, given the text and context (that is, parties' intent) of the provision; (2) whether a broad interpretation rendered art XI 'susceptible of almost indefinite expansion'; (13) and (3) the effect of characterisation of a contractual claim as breach of a treaty standard.
Transferring a contractual claim to another forum in accordance with a venue provision may result in two separate actions in two separate counties regarding the same labor, service, and materials.
The Michigan Court of Appeals began by dismissing the contractual claim.
That is not a contractual claim but is based on the law of wrongs which is a traditional common law remedy developed over the centuries by the Courts.
n THE only claim you could have would be a contractual claim on the repair, as they normally carry a warranty of up to a year.
The Ninth Circuit had to consider whether Simplot's PACA trust claim included Simplot's contractual claim for interest and attorneys' fees.
Thus, once receivables are paid, the assignee's claim is no longer a contractual claim for payment but rather a claim on the paid amounts themselves, and the focus of the legal analysis shifts from contract rights (with respect to the receivable) to property rights (on the cash proceeds of the receivable).
Without the advent of products liability law as it exists today, Sam would have been restricted to a contractual claim against the Retailer, and that claim likely would have been all for not as the Retailer is no longer in operation.