consumer

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Related to Consumers: Consumers rights

consumer

the end user of a final GOOD or SERVICE which is purchased to satisfy a personal consumption need. See BUYER BEHAVIOUR.

consumer

the basic consuming/demanding unit of economic theory In economic theory, a consuming unit can be either an individual purchaser of a good or service, a HOUSEHOLD (a group of individuals who make joint purchasing decisions) or a government. See BUYER.
References in classic literature ?
So he disbanded his army and the consumers became producers also.
said the King; "you wish to support those idle consumers again?
Although the buildings fully represent the value of the sixty thousand francs of capital, which we sunk in the district, the outlay was more than returned to us by the profits on the sales which the consumers occasioned.
Commerce is not turbulent, nor is the public consumer besieged by loud invitations to "buy.
Those who live on the frivolities of mankind, or, what is the same thing, their luxuries, have two sets of victims to plunder--the consumer, and the real producer, or the operative.
domestic producer against the greed of his consumer.
He, the bright consumer of palaces, Broad waves he his blazing banner, Red, wide and dusky, Over the strife of the valiant: His joy is in the clashing swords and broken bucklers; He loves to lick the hissing blood as it bursts warm from the wound!
He was a great consumer of meat, usually carrying his dinner to his work a couple of miles past my house -- for he chopped all summer -- in a tin pail; cold meats, often cold woodchucks, and coffee in a stone bottle which dangled by a string from his belt; and sometimes he offered me a drink.
Then, Americans can behave like real consumers, buying medical care like they buy auto insurance.
Most consumers are familiar with large consumer reporting agencies such as Equifax, TransUnion, and Experian, but most are unaware that there are others that provide information to businesses and employers.
Second, most build no direct relationships with, or knowledge of, the end consumers who buy their products.
The early consumer health information programs in the 1970s and 1980s bore witness to a radical change toward empowered consumers who began asserting their new role and questioning the state of health care practice.

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