consumerism

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consumerism

an organized movement to protect the interests of CONSUMERS by forcing companies to behave in a more socially responsible manner. The movement developed in response to the increasing technical complexity of products, the growing power of big businesses and environmental pollution. In many countries there are now consumer bodies, such as the Consumer Association in the UK, which provide product-testing facilities and publish comparative information on products through magazines such as Which. See GREEN CONSUMER.

consumerism

an organized movement to protect the economic interests of CONSUMERS. The movement developed in response to the growing market power of large companies and the increasing technical complexity of products. It embraces bodies such as the Consumers’ Association in the UK, which is concerned with product testing and informing consumers through publications such as Which? Consumerism has been officially incorporated into British COMPETITION POLICY since the 1973 FAIR TRADING ACT. See CONSUMER PROTECTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The development of a susceptibility construct for global consumer culture makes possible the identification of markets where consumers may be more likely to purchase and consume global brands.
Bunker's discussion of department stores best supports his overall argument that Mexico's political and economic elites considered a broad based consumer culture essential to furthering national development and modernization.
Iskin's work is focused in part on the role of "modern women" in consumer culture and impressionism, and ber investigation offers a nuanced perspective of late nineteenth-century representations of femininity by displacing the binaristic structure of "male gaze" upon female object.
4] Fight Club bases its social critique on the premise that a feminizing consumer culture destroys authenticity.
I will then sketch how he and his magazines interacted with various groups of intellectuals and artists during the middle decades of the twentieth century and suggest that this interaction probably shaped the consumer culture in ways that we have yet to uncover.
While children across divergent race and class backgrounds may want a lot of the same stuff, their relationship to consumer culture is highly structured by their parents' access to income and cultural capital.
Davis begins in chapter one to explore the relations between consumer culture and race with various illustrations from the writings of Booker T.
He seeks insight by examining the development of consumer culture in China and Southeast Asia during the first half of the twentieth century.
How can scholars historicize and analyze consumer culture without placing too many themes under its broad umbrella?
It emphasizes the capitalist nature of Western culture and how men's bodies have become an integral part of consumer culture.
She contends that long before the government of the United States achieved hegemonic influence, American consumer culture had infiltrated the orderly and hierarchical bourgeois society of early 20th century Europe.

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