consumer protection

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consumer protection

a generic term used to describe various pieces of legislation whose objective is to protect CONSUMERS from unscrupulous, unfair and intrusive trade practices and unsafe products. In the UK the main Acts concerning consumer protection in force at the present time are: the WEIGHTS AND MEASURES ACT 1963; the TRADE DESCRIPTIONS ACTS 1968 and 1972; the UNSOLICITED GOODS AND SERVICES ACT 1971 and 1975; the FAIR TRADING ACT 1973; the CONSUMER CREDIT ACT 1974; the CONSUMER SAFETY ACT 1978; the PRICE MARKING (BARGAIN OFFERS) ORDER 1979, SALE OF GOODS ACT 1979; SALE OF GOODS AND SERVICES ACT 1982; ESTATE AGENCY ACT 1979; CONTROL OF MISLEADING ADVERTISEMENTS REGULATIONS 1988; CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT 1987. See FINANCIAL SERVICES AUTHORITY, OMBUDSMAN, OFFICE OF FAIR TRADING, DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. See also CONSUMERISM, COMPETITION POLICY (UK) (EU).

consumer protection

measures taken by the government and independent bodies such as the Consumers’ Association in the UK to protect consumers against unscrupulous trade practices such as false descriptions of goods, incorrect weights and measures, misleading prices and defective goods. See TRADE DESCRIPTIONS ACT 1968, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES ACT 1963, CONSUMER CREDIT ACT 1974, PRICE MARKETING ( BARGAIN OFFERS) ORDER 1979, OFFICE OF FAIR TRADING, COMPETITION POLICY, CONSUMERISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Schmitz, Access to Consumer Remedies in the Squeaky Wheel System, 39 Pepp.
The letter also demands an explanation for the delay in issuing a similar do not drive instruction and consumer remedies for Mazda B-Series trucks, which are built by Ford and similar to Ford Rangers.
The so-called CAN SPAM act provides another shining example of how the GOP-controlled Congress stepped in and destroyed through preemption any consumer remedies under state law, while at the same time making the federal law completely ineffective.
Suppression of consumer remedies in the name of the free market has its roots in the Gilded Age, when the nation was ruled by what historian Richard Hofstadter so aptly dubbed the "grandiosely or corruptly rich." During the legal formalism period, a curious blend of natural law, social Darwinism, and laissez-faire economics legitimized the looting of America by plutocrats such as Jay Gould and Cornelius Vanderbilt.

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