consumed-income tax

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Consumed-Income Tax

A tax only on income that one spends on goods and services. A common example of a consumed-income tax is a sales tax. Most countries have consumed-income taxes at some level and proposals exist in the United States to shift from a mainly progressive tax system to a system that utilizes consumed income taxes predominantly or exclusively. Proponents of a consumed-income tax argue that it encourages saving and makes the economy more efficient, while opponents maintain that it adversely affects the poor, who must by necessity spend more of their income.
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consumed-income tax

A tax levied only against the part of income that is spent. Proponents of this type of taxation contend that exempting the portion of income that is saved will encourage savings, provide funds for investment, and make the economy more productive.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clifton Fleming, Jr., Scoping Out the Uncertain Simplification (Complication?) Effects of VATs, BATs and Consumed Income Taxes, 2 FLA.