Blood Diamond

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Blood Diamond

A diamond used to finance a war or rebellion. Blood diamonds are most common in Africa, where diamonds are plentiful and where there a great deal of conflict has taken place in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Trade in blood diamonds is illegal. In 2003, the United Nations put in place the Kimberley Process to certify diamonds as legitimate. Blood diamonds are also called conflict diamonds.
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Another example is the diamond company De Beers, which was the target of an international consumer campaign by Global Witness and other organizations called "Fatal Transactions" aimed at bringing public attention to the issue of conflict diamonds.
Of course, the other big beneficiaries of the conflict diamond trade are the corporations that control the industry.
In Angola, for example, De Beers estimates conflict diamond revenue for Unita to be down from a peak of around 490.
The issue facing the Kimberley Process is that blood diamonds - or conflict diamonds, to use the diamond trade's preferred term - first come onto the market as irregular rough diamonds.
php%3Foption%3Dcom_content%26view%3Darticle%26id%3D128%26Itemid%3D134%26lang%3Den) Conflict diamonds get their name from the areas where they're mined, places plagued by controversy, poor working conditions and sometimes even outright war.
102) In the 1990s, conflict diamond sales made up 15% of the world's diamond trade, and this number dropped to.
The recent attention on it conflict minerals is rooted in the actions taken around a well-known cousin, conflict diamonds.
Thus, the situation in Zimbabwe brought the conflict diamond dilemma to a head: Zimbabwe is in compliance with the KPCS (20) and is yet responsible for gross human rights violations perpetrated for the sake of diamonds.
However, due to the growing awareness of conflict diamonds and the travesties their acquisition has caused, some diamond retailers now provide a guarantee that their diamonds are conflict-free.
Warns Richman: "There is a real danger that this process that is intended to stop conflict diamonds can instead allow a monopolist like De Beers to strengthen its control over the global supply.
The Kimberley accord certification process has reduced the number of conflict diamonds hitting the market, but Oppenheimer says a film like "The Blood Diamond" could cause widespread negative perceptions of all diamonds if not handled properly.

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