confiscation

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confiscation

Seizure of private property by the government without compensation to the owner, usually as a consequence of the owner being convicted of a crime.

References in periodicals archive ?
It adds that "economic development results not from the confiscation of property and redistribution of wealth, but rather from creating a legal framework that secures title rights to land, homes and businesses, thus making private enterprise possible.
Peking University Law School Vice President Professor Wang Jiancheng stressed on the need to revise Criminal Procedure Law to facilitate the confiscation of property, which criminals have transferred overseas.
Ahead of the meeting, Vastanvi's supporters on Monday distributed at least 4,000 photocopies of a fatwa issued from Darul Ifta ( fatwa department) of Moradabad's Jamia Naeemiya, in which any forceful confiscation of property has been viewed as un- Islamic.
A similar model would not be possible in Germany, where the confiscation of property must have a constitutional basis.
He also considers the confiscation of property, the "rules of engagement" for battle, the emancipation of slaves and the ramifications of international law, especially concerning trade and blockades.
Although many scholars believe that a hardened war sentiment developed slowly over a period of two years, Siddali suggests that this development, albeit gradual, began shortly after the start of the war as the idea of confiscation of property, including slaves, began to emerge by the summer of 1861.
Monaco's legislation allows for the confiscation of property of illicit origin as well as a percentage of co-mingled illegally acquired and legitimate property.
The consequence of this law is confiscation of property, without any compensation.
The office of sheriff was instituted under Anglo-Saxon law in England to create a neutral authority which could lawfully stop the seizure and confiscation of property until notice and hearing were extended to the injured party.
Throughout Christendom Jews were afflicted with an array of legal and social disabilities that stigmatized them in the eyes of Christians: forced conversion, special taxes, extortion, forced ghettoization, confiscation of property, and the burning of synagogues.
The judge also imposed massive contempt of court fines on Mr van Hoogstraten for failing to disclose his wealth, together with orders freezing his assets and confiscation of property.