Condor

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Condor

Applies to derivative products. Option strategy consisting of both puts and calls at different strike prices to capitalize on a narrow range of volatility. The payoff diagram takes the shape of a bird.

Condor

In options, a strategy in which four contracts are bought or sold at four different strike prices. In a call condor, the investor buys the calls with the highest and lowest strike prices and sells the calls with the middle strike prices. In a put condor, the investor sells the contracts with the highest and lowest strikes and buys the middle ones. An investor engages in a condor strategy if he/she expects a great deal of volatility on the underlying asset; it allows him/her to make a profit regardless of the price of the underlying as long as it remains in a certain (broad) range. See also: Butterfly spread.
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"I visited the [Scheid] site several years ago, and based on my opinion about the condors' potential to collide with these structures, I recommended that Foundation Windpower do a study," Stake recalls.
Chris Goss's 2016 book "Fw 200 Condor Units of World War 2" details the service of a little known German aircraft that might have been among the most effective of the early 1940s--if only for its damaging psychological effects on Allied morale.
THE endangered California condor is making a comeback in the wild three decades after the giant bird nearly became extinct.
"Lead, which condors consume when scavenging at carcasses of animals killed with lead ammunition, is the main factor limiting their recovery; lead toxicosis was responsible for 26 percent of juvenile condor deaths and 67 percent of adult condor deaths between 1992 and 2009," according to a statement by AOS.
Freelance writer and photographer Chuck Graham lives one mountain range away from the Condor Trail, where he's spent much time photographing endangered California condors soaring overhead.
California condors have travelled a long, hard road.
In late 1984 and early 1985, six California condors (Gymnogyps californianus) died in the wild, leaving just nine wild and 21 captive condors in the world.
Condors usually produce only one egg, but workers at the Idaho facility plan to remove some eggs so the breeding pairs produce a second egg.
Those fragments poison more than just condors. Some 500 peer-reviewed studies have detailed the negative impacts of lead ammunition on 130 wildlife species worldwide, including bald eagles, golden eagles, and turkey vultures.
About 30 percent of blood samples collected annually from free-flying condors in California show lead concentrations high enough to affect the birds' physiology, Finkelstein and her colleagues report.