Condor

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Condor

Applies to derivative products. Option strategy consisting of both puts and calls at different strike prices to capitalize on a narrow range of volatility. The payoff diagram takes the shape of a bird.

Condor

In options, a strategy in which four contracts are bought or sold at four different strike prices. In a call condor, the investor buys the calls with the highest and lowest strike prices and sells the calls with the middle strike prices. In a put condor, the investor sells the contracts with the highest and lowest strikes and buys the middle ones. An investor engages in a condor strategy if he/she expects a great deal of volatility on the underlying asset; it allows him/her to make a profit regardless of the price of the underlying as long as it remains in a certain (broad) range. See also: Butterfly spread.
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During WWII, the Condor filled the Luftwaffe's need for a long-range aircraft that could intercept and take out the surface shipping traffic that was proving so vital to the Allied war effort and sustaining Great Britain as it defended itself against Germany's terrible aerial assaults while preparing for the water-borne invasion its leaders knew Hitler was planning.
Caption: Below left: California condors; below right: Flowers along the Condor Trail near Big Sur
In the meantime, the population of condors in the wild continues to grow.
The soldiers' excitement about the condors is reassuring to Olga Lucia Nunez, a biologist who roams the high peaks and deep valleys of these mountains, in Boyaca state in central Colombia, recruiting farmers, shepherds and, most recently, soldiers, in a broad effort to monitor and protect the birds.
Condors simply disappeared, their carcasses unavailable for necropsy.
But things just got a little better for the' California condor, thanks to legislation passed in November.
Once this process was understood, a chelation procedure was employed to remove the lead from the bodies of condors before permanent damage to digestive nerve tissue occurred, but this information could only be gained by trapping birds and taking blood samples.
Before captive-bred condors are ready for release, they must pass power pole aversion training.
State officials concerned about the fate of the world's last 144 wild condors will consider two measures next week to compel hunters to use lead-free rounds.
The first half of the book traces the condor's history: through the eyes of paleontologists, then through the reverential lore of California native tribes--complete with the uncomfortable fact that a passion for native headdresses made from dead condors may have contributed to the vulture's decline.
The Condor Haven is part of a project involving conservationists in Ecuador and Wales.
A cliff-dwelling California condor chick in Ventura County, Calif.