CFA

(redirected from Computer fraud and abuse act of 1986)
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Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA)

An experienced financial analyst who has passed examinations in economics, financial accounting, portfolio management, security analysis, and standards of conduct given by the Institute of Chartered Financial Analysts.

Chartered Financial Analyst

A professional certificate offered through the CFA Institute. The certification qualifies one to be a financial analyst. In order to qualify for a CFA, one must have worked a certain number of years in the financial industry and complete three tiers of exams on accounting, money management, economics, security analysis, and ethics.

CFA

References in periodicals archive ?
Humphrey) (discussing a hack into the computers at Los Alamos); The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986: Hearing on S.
Specht alleges that this 'continuing surveillance' and identifying cookies provides Netscape with a profile of each person's file transfers and the suit proposes that the company is in violation of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986. Specht is seeking either USD100 per day for each day the software has been available or USD10,000 per Netscape user for 'theft of private information'.

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