Commercial

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Commercial

1. Describing a company or other organization that produces, transports, or sells a commodity.

2. An advertisement, especially one broadcast on television. See also: Marketing.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
And, yes, they know that you've been using those commercial breaks to get your homework done, your beer mug refilled, and your personal relationships kept in working order, so the ad guys are ever more ingeniously knitting the commercials right into the shows.
If you are clever enough to operate a VCR, you can tape all your favorite programs and fast-forward through the commercials. If you are a Web-surfer, you can buy software with names like At Guard, Junkbuster, and Web Washer that will block the ads before they pop up on your computer screen.
Both had an enormous impact on the commercials we see today on Canadian television.
The animated commercial in Canada has come a long way in 50 years.
The only similarity between commercials airing in markets in New York, Tokyo, Moscow, Toronto or Stockholm is the Blue Diamond logo.
The cooperative pretested the grower commercials in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver and were told by the Canadians that growers standing in almonds were just too silly.
The commercial shows a man walking through his house, engaging in games of chance for advice-such as flipping a coin or using an eight ball.
The commercial will be aired on cable networks such as ESPN2 and Fox News.
Testing by IPSOS-ASI, an advertising research company, shows that Aflac's commercials scored three times the insurance norm in terms of brand-related recall.
Aflac's commercials, which some experts say rival the Eveready Energizer bunny in terms of brand value, have run on all major television networks during a host of prime-time shows and events, including Major League Baseball games and National Collegiate Athletic Association football games, the French Open and Wimbledon, the Emmy Awards and the 2002 Olympic Winter Games.
Some commercial insurers are taking a new look at the middle market because prices are firming, there are more midsize companies and insurers are seeking to diversify their risks.