Dispersion

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Related to Colloidal dispersion: coarse dispersion

Dispersion

In statistics, the placement of data points along a chart relative to an average or mean line. Dispersion is important to finance as the data points of say, a stock, determine the mean, which in turn helps determines the stock's trend. Dispersion is also used to determine volatility: data points all over the chart indicate that a stock has wild fluctuation in price.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of the analysis reported here is based on the PMF, which is the total free energy of the colloidal dispersion as a function of the colloids' relative positions, and it therefore determines the thermodynamic properties of the system.
A thermo-mechanical process employed for the preparation of fine colloidal dispersion of crumb rubber from 30 mesh crumb rubber in molten asphalt has been found to be an effective method for the preparation of crumb rubber modified binder with significantly improved high temperature properties.
Colloidal dispersions are biphasic systems and must not be confused with solutions, which, instead, are monophasic.
A symposium on Dynamic Property and Rheology of Rubber, chaired by Christopher Robertson, consultant, will include the following presentations: "Effects on filler dispersion and mechanical properties due to branching in rubber compounds," Madhu-Namani, TA Instruments--Waters LLC; "Testing the Kovacs' signatures in colloids: Thermoresponsive colloidal dispersions," Gregory McKenna, Texas Tech University; "Dynamics of confined polymers," C.
"Drying-Induced Cracks in Thin Film Fabricated from Colloidal Dispersions." Dry.
Numerous procedures exist for the synthesis of silver colloids consisting of nanometer-sized particles but preparation of concentrated colloidal dispersions is difficult to achieve.
The investigations on NIPECs flocculants, as colloidal dispersions bearing positive or negative charges in excess, which started with the preliminary studies of Kashiki and Suzuki [17, 18] and were developed in the last years [1924], have been concentrated on the use of NIPECs with molar ratio between charges ranged from 0.4 to 0.8.
These morphologies follow the crystallization principles given by Lamer and Dinegar [37], which were described in three theoretical stages; the first stage states that the concentration of the reagents in colloidal dispersions gradually increases, the second one states that the concentration of the reagents reaches a limiting state of supersaturation and the nucleation happens forming the nuclei of the crystals, and finally the third stage states that the growth of stable nuclei to form discrete particles is originated by diffusion of the dissolved species to nuclei.
Among specific topics are particle-surfactant interaction at liquid interfaces, the assembly of non-aqueous colloidal dispersions under an external electric field, low-density solid foams prepared by simple methods using highly concentrated emulsions as templates, capillary pressure experiments with single drops and bubbles, and thermodynamics and specific ion effects in connection with micellization of ionic surfactants.
Vali and Bachmann (1988) relate the ultrastructure of the colloidal dispersions of clay with rheological properties affecting the application of peloids.
Colloidal dispersions are composed of such everyday items as paint, milk, gelatin, glass, and porcelain, but their potential to create new materials remains largely untapped.