collectivism

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Collectivism

Any political or economic system that centralizes the means of production at the expense of individual ownership. Collectivism is associated with socialism, which advocates state ownership of resources. However, collectivism may exist in capitalist systems if corporations own most or all of the means of production.

collectivism

the philosophy that society is composed of groups or classes of people, each with its own interests, and that social CONFLICT stems largely from conflicts of interest between them. To achieve general wellbeing, policy makers should seek to balance group interests. Political action to advance the claims of disadvantaged groups and to regulate the actions of individuals is generally viewed as desirable by those subscribing to this philosophy TRADE UNIONS are often viewed as vehicles of collectivism in that they represent and advance group interests. Critics of this philosophy argue that it subsumes the unique interests of each individual. See INDIVIDUALISM.

collectivism

see CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMY.
References in periodicals archive ?
In terms of the attainment of certain goals, they found it to be more related to well-being in collectivist cultures than individualistic culture.
Such as land laws, created by precedents, leaving the way open for the EU to implement Agenda 21, that collectivist agenda our government has accepted, but doesn't tell you anything about.
People who are more collectivist are often driven by the norms and duties imposed by the in-group, give priority to the goals of the in-group, and try to emphasize their connectedness with the in-group.
Individualists, more concerned with individual rights, achievement, and recognition, often viewing negotiations from a distributive (win-lose) perspective, are distinct in their value system from collectivists, whose central interest is the social unit (family, community, etc.).
Government collectivists love to short-circuit the process and set their own prices.
Research indicates that equity sensitivity influences individuals' attitudes toward their organization (Kickul and Lester 2001), and the importance of equity's influence on judgments of fairness has been consistently found to be lower for collectivists than for individualists (Kim et al.
Moreover individual group members' average propensity to distrust will be higher in organizations from collectivist than from individualist cultures.
As being members of collectivist society it is expected that voting preferences of youth and adults in Pakistan is affected by their in- group members' opinion.
More specifically, it has been found that people from collectivist cultures are more responsive to the preferences of others and people from individualistic cultures are more assertive and independent (e.g., Hofstede, 1980; Triandis, 2001).
Yuki proposed that collectivist cultures were more focused on the relations between individuals within the ingroup, and that individualistic cultures were more focused on membership within a specific group.
Markus and Kitayama (1991) suggested that people in collectivist societies tend to have higher interdependent and lower independent self-construal, whereas the opposite relationship is expected in individualistic societies.
In it, 140 business students were divided into two groups and primed with either an individualist or collectivist mindset using well-established manipulations.