code

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code

(1) Any systematic collection of laws, regulations, or rules.(2) Shorthand for any of the various building codes,such as, for example,“This historic property has been updated and meets all current code requirements.”

References in periodicals archive ?
In general, NASA has chosen to instruct the Government Printing Office to remove certain NFS content from the Code of Federal Regulations but retain all NFS content as a single, integrated document in its version of the NFS.
(29) Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations, [section][section] 785.18 - 785.19, 790.6(b).
We don't expect tree climbing, garlic chopping, or running on the pool deck to be dealt with in the Code of Federal Regulations, and these can all be plenty risky if approached with the wrong level of care or coordination.
Like the opinion letter at issue in Christensen, TEI stated, Customs classification rulings and IRS revenue rulings are not subject to notice and comment and are not published in either the Federal Register or the Code of Federal Regulations. "These safeguards are required by the Administrative Procedure Act to afford an opportunity for interested persons to comment on agency interpretations before they become final," the Institute said, adding that public participation in an agency's rulemaking process is important for two reasons.
Back then, BNA had 279 full-time employees, the Federal Register had 8,902 pages, and the Code of Federal Regulations had 22,285 pages.
Current Legal Resources (CLR) has announced that it has released the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) online.
Most states have adopted the federal regulations found in Title 40, Subpart B, of the Code of Federal Regulations. New source MACT may include the use of add-on control equipment or implementation of specific work practices to reduce air toxic emissions.
Specifically, the DOT stated that it would expand the definition of "etiologic agent" to include, in addition to items listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, "...(any microorganisms or toxin) which causes or may cause severe, disabling or fatal human disease."
Title I, Subtitle A, Part III, Section 121, Paragraph (c) of the National Institutes of Health Revitalization Act of 1993 contains the following sentence: "The provisions of section 204(d) of part 46 of title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations (45 CFR 46.204(d)) shall not have any legal effect." On its face, this sentence would not seem to merit much attention, and in fact, as the bill sailed through Congress this past year, it didn't get much.
Heckman says, "We explicitly asked that FDA clarify the language in the Preamble to reflect the fact that a company may continue to determine on its own whether a package or packaging component may reasonably be expected to migrate to food." Regardless of FDA's intention, Heckman says, if the agency does not clarify the Preamble, it could cause "a significant change in how the marketplace reacts to colorants and perhaps all packaging components." This is because an erroneous perception by packaging users might lead them to request only materials approved in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
Especially helpful are the book's references to and incorporation of the applicable Board rules and regulations contained in Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations, which basically flesh out the procedures outlined in the National Labor Relations Act itself.
Mountain bikes are prohibited from National Forest Wilderness Areas by the Wilderness Act of 1964 and a recent revision to the Code of Federal Regulations (36 CFR 261.16) that explicitly prohibits the "possession or use of a hang glider or bicycle." The National Park Service prohibits "wheeled vehicles" from its Wilderness Areas in Isle Royale and Yellow-stone.