Fiber

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Fiber

A slang term for the euro-U.S. dollar exchange rate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kano, "Climbing fiber synapse elimination in cerebellar Purkinje cells," European Journal of Neuroscience, vol.
Mintz, "Participation of multiple calcium channel types in transmission at single climbing fiber to Purkinje cell synapses," Neuron, vol.
LTD is induced by coupled activation of two glutamatergic synaptic input pathways, parallel fibers and a climbing fiber. How each contributes to LTD and where the two signaling pathways converge in a Purkinje cell, are critical for understanding the induction mechanism of LTD.
(38)-(40) PKC[alpha] is a convergent point for the two signaling pathways, as it is synergistically activated by intracellular [Ca.sup.2+] which is located downstream of a climbing fiber pathway (Fig.
+] channel CF: Climbing fiber CR: Conditioned response CS: Complex spike CSt: Conditioned stimulus DCN: Deep cerebellar nuclei EPSP: Excitatory postsynaptic potential FAS: Fetal alcohol syndrome [GABA.sub.A]: [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor type A GC: Granular cell GFAP: Glial fibrillary acid protein IN: Interpositus nucleus IO: Inferior olive IPSP: Inhibitory postsynaptic potential LFP: Local field potential LTD: Long-term depression LTP: Long-term potentiation MF: Mossy fiber PC: Purkinje Cell PF: Parallel fiber SS: Simple spike UR: Unconditioned response USt: Unconditioned stimulus VOR: Vestibulo-ocular reflex.
Sulcus PC arbors are also more frequently innervated by multiple climbing fibers relative to PC arbors of the apex and bank, further underscoring the uniqueness of the sulcus [4].
The Scripps group finds that in normal rats an intoxicating dose of alcohol increases the activity of one major source of input to Purkinje cells, the nerve processes called climbing fibers. This is a particularly important input, explains Bloom's co-worker Steven Henrisken, because it preempts the Purkinje cell, interrupting the cell's other activities.