Clayton Act

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Clayton Act

A 1914 American antitrust law that expanded and clarified the Sherman Act of 1890. The act prohibited price discrimination, mergers that substantially decrease competition, and other practices that the Sherman Act left for court interpretation. Significantly, the Clayton Act exempted unions and labor organizations from its provisions because the Sherman Act had been used to restrict the ability to strike.

Clayton Act

A 1914 federal antitrust law designed to promote competition by prohibiting or severely restricting practices such as the acquisition of competitors, price discrimination, secret rebates, and interlocking directorates.
References in periodicals archive ?
(10) The Clayton Antitrust Act was first applied to bank mergers with enactment of the Celler-Kefauver Antimerger Act of 1950.
(3,4,5) From the Sherman Antitrust Act in 1890 followed by Clayton Antitrust Act in 1914; the snowball effect started culminating in the establishment of the Federal Trade Commission with its subsequent acts.
Both agencies are still probing the merger, with DOJ focusing on the Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914 and FCC on the Telecommunications Act of 1996.
The Consolidation Prevention and Competition Promotion Act of 2019 would restore the original purpose of the Clayton Antitrust Act to promote competition and protect American consumers.
The Federal Reserve Act of 1913 and the Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914 establish the Federal Reserve Board and the Federal Trade Commission, respectively.
He pushed through the Clayton Antitrust Act and took on companies like International Harvester and American Sugar.
Hagens Berman said Google infringed various federal antitrust laws such as the Sherman Act, Clayton Antitrust Act, California Unfair Competition Law and California Cartwright Act.
By 1915, when the Supreme Court invoked the new Clayton Antitrust Act to dismantle the Trust, competition from these outlaw companies had already rendered it a dead letter, and the motion picture industry had been permanently chased out of New Jersey.
Under the Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914, directors are forbidden from sitting on the board of two companies where that would reduce competition.
Fifty petitioners who said they have been customers of the two airlines and will likely continue to be in the future said the merger violates Section 7 of the Clayton Antitrust Act as it will curb competition within the airline industry.