Civil Rights Act of 1964

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Civil Rights Act of 1964

Legislation in the United States that prohibited racial discrimination in government, education and employment. It prohibited businesses from refusing to serve persons on the basis of race and it required judges to apply voter registration requests equally to all races. It invalidated state laws establishing racial segregation, and had the effect in some states of requiring school districts to bus students to other districts to conform to racial quotas. The Act is considered a landmark of the American civil rights movement.

Civil Rights Act of 1964

On November 27, 1963, newly sworn-in President Lyndon Johnson

called for the passage of a new civil rights bill, as a tribute to the late President John F. Kennedy, who had been assassinated only weeks earlier. The resulting bill was signed into law on July 7, 1964, with a stated purpose: “To enforce the constitutional right to vote, to confer jurisdiction upon the district courts of the United States to provide injunctive relief against discrimination in public accommodations, to authorize the Attorney General to institute suits to protect constitutional rights in public facilities and public education,to extend the Commission on Civil Rights,to prevent discrimination in federally assisted programs, to establish a Commission on Equal Employment Opportunity, and for other purposes.” It has come to be identified with halting discrimination in public accommodations—restaurants, hotels, and other public facilities.

References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to ending this discriminatory practice, the settlement requires Renewal by Andersen to train its employees about District civil rights laws and pay $50,000 to the District.
The case, in which a conservative Christian bakery owner seeks the right to discriminate against gay couples, is the latest attempt by conservatives to carve out special exemption for business owners to civil rights laws.
To determine whether a given worker is an em-ployee for purposes of civil rights law, BOLI uses the "right-to-control" test.
Justice Alito cited the fact that the law was updated after the court's 1969 decision that read into the 19th-century civil rights law a right to sue for retaliation.
The insurance company defendants "do not point to an insurance pricing regulatory goal which is hampered by the application of the civil rights laws to the credit-scoring practice at issue here, save the implied goal of allowing the states to pursue their pricing regulatory goals in isolation, Judge Fortunato P.
Labor law, civil rights law, and even telecommunications law all focus on allocations and thus populations.
Plaintiff's counsel argued that recent federal civil rights law amendments do not impose a direct evidence requirement, but rather only require evidence that gender was a "motivating" factor to establish that the employer engaged in an "unlawful employment practice."
Congress can reverse the Supreme Court's decision about attorney fees by simply amending the civil rights law to provide that a litigant is considered a prevailing party entitled to fees if the lawsuit "was a substantial factor" in remedial action taken by the government and the suit brought by the plaintiff had a "substantial basis in fact and law." That was the rule generally applied by the lower courts before the Supreme Court decision.
Americans will pay the costs of that agenda for years to come, in terms of racial division, weakened civil rights law enforcement, and most tragic of all, missed opportunities.
Erin Kelly and Frank Dobbin of Princeton University also took the award for "Civil Rights Law at Work: Sex Discrimination and the Rise of Maternity Leave Policies" (American Journal of Sociology 105[September]: 455-92).
Unenthusiastic about paying taxes to replace previously free extralegal racial justice with a costly court system that also entangled them, discontented white Mississippians responded by drawing on community-based va lue systems that privileged the "people's law." After 1873, hostility toward constitutionalism, an anti-Republican sentiment, and the passage of Mississippi's civil rights law finally united whites who felt that the election of blacks imperiled total white community power and that black aspirations could no longer be circumscribed.
This Court is in receipt of a notice of motion, fried by proposed intervenor, Courtroom Television Network, seeking an order (a) permitting Courtroom Television Network to televise the trial in this action and (b) determining that Courtroom Television Network may televise the trial in this action, subject to coverage guidelines set forth in the papers submitted by Courtroom Television Network on the grounds that [sections] 52 of the Civil Rights Law is unconstitutional.

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