Civil Rights Act of 1968


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Fair Housing Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1968, that prohibited discrimination in the sale or rental of a private home based on the buyer's or renter's race, religion, or national origin. The Act was later amended to include gender, ability, and families with children under its protected classes. Critics allege that it provides few enforcement mechanisms and discrimination still occurs. It is also called the Civil Rights Act of 1968. See also: Community Reinvestment Act.

Civil Rights Act of 1968

Expanded upon prior civil rights acts, especially the Civil Rights Act of 1866 and the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The Act was passed one week after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King. One improvement was the provision of federal solutions to aid in stopping discrimination. Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 is also known as the Fair Housing Act. Additional information is available at the Web site of the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division,www.usdoj.gov/crt/crt-home.html.

References in periodicals archive ?
After approval of the Senate bill by the House of Representatives on April 10, 1968, President Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1968, including Title VIII, into law the next day.
The first was policy: Laws were passed and some changed to address these issues, such as the Civil Rights Act of 1968 prohibiting discrimination concerning the sale, rental, and financing of housing.
57a(f)(3)); section 808(c) of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C.
1991) (holding that agency failure to consider the effect of a mixed-use development project on the racial composition of surrounding low- and moderate-income neighborhoods violated Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968); NAACP v.
1974) (holding that HUD violated Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Fifth Amendment by approving a housing project that discriminated against African-Americans); Graves v.
The Court then contrasted pre-CRA Title VII with other federal antidiscrimination statutes, such as Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 and 42 USC Section 1981, which do provide for jury trials and for the recovery of tort-type damages.
La Course noted that some tribal officials maintain an iron grip on their newspapers despite the Indian Civil Rights Act of 1968, which guarantees a right to a free press.
Thirty-nine years ago, the Civil Rights Act of 1968, Title VIII, mandated that housing choices could not be limited by unfair housing actions toward anyone.
Duro appealed his misdemeanor conviction on the grounds that the Indian Civil Rights Act of 1968 prohibits tribes from prosecuting non-Indians.
The Act amended Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 (42 USC [sub-sections] 3601-3619) by expanding the definition of prohibited housing practices to include discrimination based on familial status.