Civil Rights Act of 1964


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Civil Rights Act of 1964

Legislation in the United States that prohibited racial discrimination in government, education and employment. It prohibited businesses from refusing to serve persons on the basis of race and it required judges to apply voter registration requests equally to all races. It invalidated state laws establishing racial segregation, and had the effect in some states of requiring school districts to bus students to other districts to conform to racial quotas. The Act is considered a landmark of the American civil rights movement.

Civil Rights Act of 1964

On November 27, 1963, newly sworn-in President Lyndon Johnson

called for the passage of a new civil rights bill, as a tribute to the late President John F. Kennedy, who had been assassinated only weeks earlier. The resulting bill was signed into law on July 7, 1964, with a stated purpose: “To enforce the constitutional right to vote, to confer jurisdiction upon the district courts of the United States to provide injunctive relief against discrimination in public accommodations, to authorize the Attorney General to institute suits to protect constitutional rights in public facilities and public education,to extend the Commission on Civil Rights,to prevent discrimination in federally assisted programs, to establish a Commission on Equal Employment Opportunity, and for other purposes.” It has come to be identified with halting discrimination in public accommodations—restaurants, hotels, and other public facilities.

References in periodicals archive ?
Periodically, we pause to reflect on great moments in history such as the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In 2014, fifty years after the enactment of the Act, which sought to end segregation in public places and ban employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex and national origin, we must reflect and ask--has the Civil Rights Act of 1964 lived up to its promise?
Constitution ensconced these ideas in the Fourteenth Amendment, and it was pursuant to this power that Congress enacted the Civil Rights Act of 1964, turning the page of history against legal and institutionalized discrimination, and fulfilling our civic duty to stop this type of insidious harm.
3 Massive discrimination orchestrated by the federal government: "This catch-all category began under Woodrow Wilson and ended under Richard Nixon, who finally enforced the Civil Rights Act of 1964. It includes the segregation of federal offices, the segregation of the military, the Tuskegee experiment, and Jim Crow, in which the federal government refused to use its powers under the 14th Amendment to stop the administration of two sets of laws for different citizens."
King's dream began to be realized when President Lyndon Johnson passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 .
Decades of struggle, sit-ins, marches, organizing and political work won the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In addition to protecting the rights of the African Americans who led the movement, the Civil Rights Act also protects a wide array of newer populations within the United States.
As part of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Congress established a series of programs to help low-income Americans enter college, graduate and move on to participate more fully in America's economic and social life.
It also provides access to federal civil rights laws, including the ADA, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, civil rights opinions from the U.S.
But a national Hispanic advocacy group is warning administrators to be clear: Even if a teacher, cafeteria worker, receptionist or bus driver discriminates against anyone based on race, ethnicity, national origin or language, the entire district--if it receives any federal funding--could be violating Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and could lose its money.
Thus, resentment from the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and sustained federal interventionism ran so deep that in the space of less than twenty years, southern whites abandoned the party of their ancestors (something not easily done by southerners) and embraced the party of Lincoln, remade in the image of Barry Goldwater (139).
Rosa Parks became known as "the Mother of the Civil Rights Movement." Her brave action, and the nonviolent protests that followed, led to the passage of new laws protecting the rights of black citizens, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
It would culminate a decade after the Montgomery bus boycott in federal legislation aimed at guaranteeing equal rights to black Americans, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
"The legal reason is that the UM case was based on the Constitution, but the court has ruled that under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 the same standards apply to all institutions that receive federal financial assistance, including federal student financial aid, so that includes private institutions as well as public," she says.