Civil Rights Act of 1964

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Civil Rights Act of 1964

Legislation in the United States that prohibited racial discrimination in government, education and employment. It prohibited businesses from refusing to serve persons on the basis of race and it required judges to apply voter registration requests equally to all races. It invalidated state laws establishing racial segregation, and had the effect in some states of requiring school districts to bus students to other districts to conform to racial quotas. The Act is considered a landmark of the American civil rights movement.

Civil Rights Act of 1964

On November 27, 1963, newly sworn-in President Lyndon Johnson

called for the passage of a new civil rights bill, as a tribute to the late President John F. Kennedy, who had been assassinated only weeks earlier. The resulting bill was signed into law on July 7, 1964, with a stated purpose: “To enforce the constitutional right to vote, to confer jurisdiction upon the district courts of the United States to provide injunctive relief against discrimination in public accommodations, to authorize the Attorney General to institute suits to protect constitutional rights in public facilities and public education,to extend the Commission on Civil Rights,to prevent discrimination in federally assisted programs, to establish a Commission on Equal Employment Opportunity, and for other purposes.” It has come to be identified with halting discrimination in public accommodations—restaurants, hotels, and other public facilities.

References in periodicals archive ?
Since 1964, the Civil Rights Act has stood as the pillar of fairness and justice on which we have built remarkable progress for all Americans.
In addition to monetary relief, Guidance Charter School will review and revise its policies and procedures regarding compliance with the EPA and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, implement training to all employees regarding equal pay practices, sex discrimination and retaliation, develop a centralized tracking system for policy dissemination and discrimination, unequal pay, or retaliation complaints, and submit annual reports to the EEOC verifying compliance with the decree.
Passed just months after ratification of the 13th Amendment, the Civil Rights Act of 1866 was an "Act to Protect All Persons in the United States in their Civil Rights, and Furnish the Means of their Vindication." Among other provisions, the Act granted citizenship to all persons born in the U.S.
Upon signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, President Lyndon B.
District Court in Forth Worth, Texas, charged the company with violating Title VII of the Civil Rights Act 'by denying a reasonable religious accommodation' to James Robinson III, a Seventh-day Sabbatarian, and Chris Scruggs, a Messianic Jew, who had previously taken off religious holidays without pay.
On June 19, 1963, President Kennedy sent a Civil Rights Act to Congress.
According to the Journal Gazette, the defense is also arguing that protections against sex discrimination under the Civil Rights Act cannot be enforced for employees like Herx without violating established exemptions for religious employers.
And if the 1964 Civil Rights Act can be read to imply that Rose has broken the law, then the law should be changed to conform with the only moral purpose of law, which is to protect people's rights to act on their judgment, to use their property as they see fit, and to contract with others voluntarily.
"The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom" highlights the legal and legislative straggles and victories leading to its passage, shedding light on the individuals--both prominent leaders and private citizens--who participated in the decades-long campaign for equality.
The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Enacted July 2, 1964) is a landmark piece of civil rights legislation in the United States that outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.
AUSTIN, Texas -- President Barack Obama on Thursday paid tribute to the Civil Rights Act a half century after its passage transformed American society and ultimately paved the way for the day when the United States might have an African-American man serve in the Oval Office.
Part two focuses on Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, with chapters on covered entities, defining and proving discrimination, the prohibited classifications, procedural requirements for private sector employees, federal government employees, class actions, and remedies.