Choppy Market

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Choppy Market

A situation in which prices in a market or index fluctuate, sometimes wildly, but end at a rough equilibrium. A choppy market may be a short-term trend. For example, NASDAQ may begin a week or month at 1,500 and fluctuate as low as 1,100 or as high as 1,900, but end the period at roughly 1,500.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stocks have taken a hit as investors battle choppy markets and uncertainty surrounding US-China trade relations.
Against a backdrop of choppy markets and elections, BPI's lending business with top corporations grew by 25.5 percent year-on-year in the first semester, driving growth in overall corporate business to 20.4 percent.
Choppy markets, leveraged lending guidance that restrained highly leveraged buyouts and recapitalizations, and fewer refinancing opportunities weighed on issuance in 2015 and are unlikely to abate in 2016.
"Turbulent and choppy markets, such as the ones we are witnessing today, present investors with an opportunity to reevaluate the strategic role gold may play in a portfolio," Mazza explained in a report on Tuesday.
In a year of growth scares and choppy markets, it's little wonder investors were skittish.
Stricter regulation and choppy markets had affected profits, the bank said.
Finally, women stay the course in choppy markets. Vanguard analyzed nearly 3 million IRA accounts during the 2008-2009 financial crisis: Women were more likely to leave their portfolios intact and did not sell at the wrong time.
Thursday did nothing to ease choppy markets as the Swiss National Bank announced it was abandoning its minimum exchange rate for the franc.
But recent data show some hedge-fund equity strategies are attracting money, as investors seek out the approaches that worked best in choppy markets, such as bets on price drops as well as gains.
HSBC said it expected more "choppy markets" this year as adjustments are made to changing economic circumstances.
He said the bank was "optimistic about the longer-term prospects of emerging markets" despite its own expectations "of greater volatility in 2014 and choppy markets".
Wall Street has struggled with new regulations and choppy markets.