Child

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Child

For tax purposes, the term child includes the taxpayer's son, duaghter, stepchild, eligible foster child, or a descedant of any of them, or an adopted child. It also includes the taxpayer's brother, sister, half brother, half sister, stepbrother, stepsister, or a descendant of any of them.
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References in classic literature ?
'You poor motherless children! How I pity you; and yet I can do nothing to help you!
'Who's there?' she snarled, in an awful voice, when she saw the children.
"What are you doing here?" he cried in a very gruff voice, and the children ran away.
The birds did not care to sing in it as there were no children, and the trees forgot to blossom.
"The children did not love me at first; I was such a sickly, awkward kind of a fellow then--and I know I am ugly.
She was the first to cast her into ignominy; but when they all heard that Marie had returned to the village, they ran out to see her and crowded into the little cottage--old men, children, women, girls--such a hurrying, stamping, greedy crowd.
She used to stay in the country as a child, and the impression she had retained of it was that the country was a refuge from all the unpleasantness of the town, that life there, though not luxurious--Dolly could easily make up her mind to that--was cheap and comfortable; that there was plenty of everything, everything was cheap, everything could be got, and children were happy.
Dolittle seems to extend his hand from the page and grasp that of his reader, and I can see him going down the centuries a kind of Pied Piper with thousands of children at his heels.
Mr Allworthy answered to all this, and much more, which the captain had urged on this subject, "That, however guilty the parents might be, the children were certainly innocent: that as to the texts he had quoted, the former of them was a particular denunciation against the Jews, for the sin of idolatry, of relinquishing and hating their heavenly King; and the latter was parabolically spoken, and rather intended to denote the certain and necessary consequences of sin, than any express judgment against it.
Then the King and Queen flew home to their children and cried:
I think that punishment by depriving children of sweets only develops their greediness.
Forth sallied the two children, with a hop-skip-and-jump, that carried them at once into the very heart of a huge snow-drift, whence Violet emerged like a snow-bunting, while little Peony floundered out with his round face in full bloom.

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