welfare

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Welfare

A generic term for many government assistance programs. In general, it refers to programs in which the government pays money to indigent and unemployed persons. However, it may include non-cash payments such as food stamps. It may or may not include a requirement that able-bodied persons on welfare attempt to find work. Welfare is very controversial. Proponents argue that it helps the persons least able to help themselves, while critics contend it encourages people not to work. See also: TANF, Dole.

welfare

that aspect of management concerned with the wellbeing, both physical and emotional, of employees. It is an umbrella term for a range of services and activities. HEALTH AND SAFETY (the regulation of working conditions) is probably the most important but is often managed separately from other welfare functions. Other welfare activities include the provision of canteens and social clubs, sports facilities, medical officers etc. Some organizations also provide counselling services to help individuals cope with, for instance, work-related stress.

The reasoning behind employer concern with welfare suggests that a contented workforce is likely to be more productive. Some employers also feel that it is a social obligation to their employees. Welfare activities usually come under the remit of the PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT function. In fact, in the UK the origins of personnel management lie in the concern to improve employee welfare felt by certain employers in the early years of the 20th century. See FRINGE BENEFIT, HUMAN RELATIONS. See also SOCIAL SECURITY.

References in periodicals archive ?
The ACFs Childrens Bureau administers funding for child welfare agencies and courts.
But in the light of the great uncertainty that now prevails, the Child Welfare Service cannot maintain that a move to India would be in the best interests of the children.
Unfortunately, the most common situation, in which impoverished parents are experiencing child welfare difficulties which can be alleviated by provision of supports and resources appropriate to the problems, will most likely not be adequately addressed even if a report is made and substantiated.
Child welfare agencies have finite funds to help with housing.
Given recent cuts to child welfare in the Deficit Reduction Act, significant increases in child welfare funding seem unlikely, so proposals for reform have focused primarily on flexible use of existing funds.
GeoSpatial Case Manager was developed to extract data from the existing databases in child welfare agencies and, using Microsoft(R) MapPoint 2004, visually express that data on a map.
The department noted that caseloads are too heavy in all states, and that child welfare programs would attain better results if caseworkers had more time for family visits.
What form that action should take, and how the amalgam of actors that make up the Child welfare system should handle these emotionally charged situations, is the subject of this illuminating book.
But by now, the stories have generally faded from the public consciousness except for the bare outlines, in part because they sound so much like so many child welfare horrors in other cities and towns.
Some of this relates directly to welfare status, notes a spokesperson for the Child Welfare League of America.
A short visit to Canada centring on child welfare policy and practice, highlighted for me the similarities between issues and developments in this country and Australia.

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