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cell

an independent team of operatives who work together in a CELLULAR MANUFACTURING production environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
(7,18) Immunohistochemically, the chief cells are positive for neuroendocrine markers, tyrosine hydroxylase, and GATA3, whilst the surrounding sustentacular cells express S100 and GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein).
Chief cells: The chief cells can be recognized at the 13th week of development (42).
The chief cells also appear normal and occupy about a quadrant of the gastric mucosa.
As chief cells are the secretory cells, detailed study of their age related changes will be helpful in analysing the reason behind the higher occurrence of osteoporosis, nephropathy and other clinical conditions related with hyperparathyroidism with advancing age.
Parietal cells are mitochondria-rich whereas chief cells only show weak porin expression (Figures 6(b) and 6(f) and Figures 2(g), 2(h), and 2(i)).
These alterations were more notable in the small intestine and colon than stomach; however, the stomach showed the intensive nuclei in a blue color, supposedly because of migration of gastric chief cells to the outer layer of the stomach lining.
The gastric glands occupied all the la- mina propria and consisted of mucous neck cells, parietal cells and chief cells. The localization of these three kinds of cells varied between species (Ghoshal & Bal).
The chief cells are distorted and shrunken and due to shrinkage, the pericellular spaces around these cells are very much increased.
The patient underwent right lower parathyroidectomy and its histopathology report showed abundant clear cells and chief cells in a disarray with increased nucleus to cytoplasmic ratio, neutrophilic infiltrate and a rim of compressed normal parathyroid parenchyma with intact capsule.
Recently, the applicant identified Troy+ chief cells as a novel stem cell population in the corpus epithelium.
In the new report, Mills, graduate student Greg Sibbel and Hans Clevers, MD, PhD, a geneticist at Utrecht Medical Centre, identified markers that show a small number of chief cells become stem cells even in the absence of serious injury.
When chief cells in our parathyroid glands sense that calcium in our blood is too low, parathyroid hormone is released, resulting in an increase of serum calcium through multiple means: receptor-mediated tubular reabsorption of calcium in the kidney, release of skeletal calcium stores, upregulation of 1-a-hydroxylase leading to increased 1,25-d hyd roxy-yitamin D production, and increased calcium reabsorption from the gastrointestinal tract!

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