CC

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CC

The two-character ISO 3166 country code for COCOS (KEELING) ISLANDS.

CC

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for the Territory of the Cocos Islands, also known as the Keeling Islands. This is the code used in international transactions to and from Cocossian bank accounts.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for the Cocos Islands. This is used as an international standard for shipping to the Cocos Islands.
References in periodicals archive ?
MCCDs are noninvasive circulation support devices that function manually, pneumatically, or electrically and in accordance with CPR guidelines, provide uninterrupted and effective external chest compression to achieve an adequate blood flow to the heart and other vital organs during non-traumatic adult cardiac arrest.
Successful percutaneous treatment of an intraprocedural left main stent thrombosis with the support of an automatic mechanical chest compression device.
The nonparametric Chi-Square for independence test was used to explore the relationship between gender, BMI, and CPR, particularly the chest compression depth and rate as well as ventilation.
SOS-KANTO Study Group, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation by bystanders with chest compression only (SOS-KANTO): an observational study.
Changing the sequence from A-B-C to C-A-B for adults and children allows all rescuers to begin chest compressions right away.
13) During CPR for early intervention in cardiac arrest, chest compressions are necessary as the external mechanism to promote internal blood flow to the body tissues.
When seeking out chest compression measurement methods, engineers faced a multitude of challenges.
Strong evidence points to the importance of optimizing chest compressions, even at the expense of ventilation, he said.
One of the major changes is the recognition that a pulse check is unreliable, and recommendation that no pulse check be done before bystanders begin administering chest compressions to an unconscious person.
Results of a seven-year study comparing the effects of chest compression only versus standard CPR (including mouth-to-mouth) found that survival results were not significantly different whether mouth-to-mouth was given or not.
5% increase in survival with chest compressions alone when compared with chest compressions with mouth-to-mouth ventilation.
In the case of both infants and small children, give breaths during a pause after every fifth chest compression.