Cheap Stock

Cheap Stock

The practice of issuing stock in a company at too low a price immediately before an IPO. Generally, the cheap stock is offered at only a small fraction of the company's expected share price after the IPO. An underwriter may offer cheap stock in order to attract investors who might make a quick profit from the company or to potential managers in the company. Offering cheap stock is illegal.
References in periodicals archive ?
If tanneries have greater supplies than capacities, it is because they overbought the cheap stock,' he said while referring to a press report about hides going to waste in Kasur.
Equity awards issued to employees at less than fair value may be considered grants of "cheap stock," he added, which could complicate valuation, reporting and other issues for the company and, potentially, the employee.
THAT Spotify or Apple Music subscription isn't working as hard as it could be if you're still using the cheap stock headphones that came with your expensive mobile.
We put five sets of bluetooth earbuds to the test THAT Spotify or Apple Music subscription isn't working as hard as it could be if you're still using the cheap stock headphones that came with your expensive mobile.
Scotland's central belt continues to offer strong fundamentals, comparatively attractive lease structures, and relatively cheap stock - a healthy combination for investors, particularly those from overseas as Brexit weighs down on the value of sterling.
This happens because there's not a lot of meat on a cheap stock to offer the action tang any stability If your rifle has a cheap stock, please, for the children, keep an eye on that rear action screw.
Images and videos can also add tremendous value to your work, but if you're not taking behind the scenes everyday pictures that are supposed to be grainy and spontaneous, posting cheap stock imagery means risking the uniqueness and authenticity of your brand.
Coun Barbara Dring, chair of the city council's Licensing and Public Protection Committee, said: "People who bought any of these spirits were potentially put at risk as a result of the retailers buying unrealistically cheap stock."
Cable told the committee: "There have been people out there rather unwisely listening to a few people operating on the fringe of the market and saying this is cheap stock, rush out and buy it.
Investors will spot an opportunity to take advantage of unusually cheap stock prices, and rush in quickly before prices go up again, when they will exit their investment with (ideally) a tidy profit.
For investors in the audience, he noted that insurance companies, which tend not to attract mainstream institutional investors, are "cheap stock" right now.