Slavery

(redirected from Chattel slaves)
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Slavery

The practice in which one person owns another person, or at least that person's labor. In either case, the owner does not compensate the slave for his/her work. Slavery is one of the world's oldest institutions. In the modern world, it is considered one of the most egregious human rights violations. It is illegal in nearly every country, but still exists. In the present, it is strongly associated with sexual trafficking and forced domestic servants.
References in periodicals archive ?
After exploring the genesis of the institution of public slaves (Chapter 1), investigating their various tasks and functions (Chapter 2), and marking their strangeness of privileged status by contrast to that of the more normal run of the far more numerous privately owned chattel slaves (Chapter 3), Ismard turns to "the democratic order of knowledge" (Chapter 4) and "the mysteries of the Greek state" (Chapter 5).
But in Europe high art and portraiture was the privilege of the rich and powerful in courts and great houses, so the Africans who appear in paintings are not those who laboured on slave plant-ations, but domestic servants, chattel slaves and horse grooms singled out for personal service (Fig.
From the African viewpoint, it was a system which instigated wars in Africa, harvested the prisoners of those wars, sold them on the African coast, trans-shipped and resold them on the American coast, and then worked them to death as chattel slaves on the plantations and mines of the Americas.
But if Freeman's slaves represent nothing more than chattel slaves, the play condemns English revolutionaries for overstating their own sufferings by misunderstanding the nightmarish reality of actual slavery.
The standard practice of referring to chattel slaves as "negroes," a term taken from the Spanish, and overt avoidance of referring to them as "slaves," either in personal correspondence or in official legislation indicate the subtle adoption of an ostensibly foreign practice.
Charles Bolton defined these men and women in purely economic terms--whites who possessed neither land nor chattel slaves. Forret expands on this definition in two ways, each contingent on the other.