Chaos Theory

(redirected from Chaotic behavior)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia.

Chaos Theory

A theory stating that seemingly unrelated events affect each other in a predictable, mathematical way. In investing, chaos theory is used to predict future stock prices using information that does not seem to affect prices directly, such as trading volume and trader sentiment. Computing these factors using chaos theory is as complex as it is controversial.
References in periodicals archive ?
9999) plays a crucial role, because it provides a better chaotic behavior of the logistic map.
1991, "The Chaotic Behavior of Foreign Exchange Rates," American Economist, 35, 16-24.
2002) resuming two original non-linear complex models of both types of bearings, studying their dynamical behavior, finding some values of critical damping coefficient and some zones of chaotic behavior.
Chaotic behavior is interesting because it can potentially explain fluctuations in the economy and financial markets, which appear to be random processes.
The third moment test provides strong indications of the existence of chaotic behavior in the Aaa and Baa bond portfolios.
By entering a negative number into Cell A3 of the spreadsheet in Figure 1, students can find themselves confronted with seemingly chaotic behavior as the spreadsheet's successive calculations no longer converge to a square root (Figure 3).
According to Wright, the increase in complexity in society (both local and global) will result in good outcomes (win-win situations), whereas Kaplan argues that the change to a global community has only increased the level of chaotic behavior throughout.
Many pathological states of mental disorders are characterized by a lack of ability to let exterior factors influence the development of mental activities and instead proceed in a closed chaotic behavior determined by intrinsic factors.
The core of this cluster of theories is the methodological principle that apparently chaotic behavior can be patterned in complex ways, and that we should model this behavior from the "bottom up" and then look for patterns.
In this paper, the problem of controlling continuous polymerization reactors at conditions where chaotic behavior is present is addressed.
Previous causal analyses of crime cycles are replaced by chaotic systems analyses, where the systems are societies construed as sets of pairs of human beings ensconced within national borders, producing unpredictable chaotic behavior wherever responsiveness (or compassion) provide a social resonance that produces the characteristic constrained periodic phenomena of chaotic motion.
We show how the correlation dimension reflects the degree to which chaotic behavior characterizes the fluctuations in the exchange rate, and how this conforms with ideas about exchange rate management.