Manipulation

(redirected from Cervical manipulation)
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Manipulation

Dealing in a security to create a false appearance of active trading, in order to bring in more traders. Illegal.

Manipulation

The attempt or act to artificially change the price of a security or a market movement with the intent to make a profit. One example is wash selling, in which an investor both sells then quickly re-buys the same security, hoping to create the impression of increased trading volume, and therefore raise the price. Another is churning, in which an investor makes both buy and sell orders through different brokers to create the impression of increased interest in the security and raise the price. Manipulation can be used to both increase and decrease prices, depending on the investor's perceived needs. Manipulation is illegal under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. See also: Antitrust, Fix.
References in periodicals archive ?
Membrane stripping and cervical manipulation to release prostaglandins can be considerably vigorous.
The most common site of injury to the vertebral artery following cervical manipulation appears to be at the site of the atlanto-occipital joint, where the artery changes its vertical course to a horizontal one.
Kawchuk G, Jhangri G, Hurwitz EL, Wynd S, Haldeman S and Hill M (2008): The relation between the spatial distribution of vertebral artery compromise and exposure to cervical manipulation.
Thalamic infarction secondary to cervical manipulation.
Retention of blinding at follow-up in a randomized clinical study using a sham-control cervical manipulation procedure for neck pain: secondary analyses from a randomized clinical study.
Current understanding of the relationship between cervical manipulation and stroke: what does it mean for the chiropractic profession?
The cervical spinal manipulative procedures AA/O used by respondents in this study for the cervical spine were the Supine Rotary Cervical manipulation with Lateral Flexion (81%) and the Supine Rotary manipulation (74.
All published, peer-reviewed interventional studies involving more than ten subjects receiving cervical manipulation (defined as an HVLA procedure), delivered by a licensed healthcare professional, for the treatment of CR (confirmed via special imaging and/or clinical examination or described as neck and arm pain/paresthesia) were eligible for inclusion.
Upper cervical manipulation was deferred in order to monitor her response to treatment of the ear.
Although a strong scientific case was made to defend the use of cervical manipulation by the chiropractic profession, the battle was, for the most part, already lost at street level.