Central Treaty Organization

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Central Treaty Organization

A former international organization consisting of Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Turkey and the United Kingdom. The United States was also involved peripherally. It was modeled after NATO and was intended to resist Soviet expansion into the Middle East and South Asia. It was largely unsuccessful in this mission; for example, Iraq left the organization after it opened diplomatic relations with the Soviet Union in 1958. It was also known as CENTO and the Baghdad Pact. It existed from 1955 to 1979.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the cold war when the world was divided into two blocs, Pakistan was on the side of America and was a part of Central Treaty Organisation (CENTO), a least successful alliance made up of unlikely allies like Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Turkey and the United Kingdom in 1955.
Pakistan joined the Cold War alliances, such as the Central Treaty Organisation and Southeast Asia Treaty Organisation to prepare for a military response to India, while the US objective was to contain the Soviet Union.
6 The CENTO, or Central Treaty Organisation, a political-military alliance meant as a defence against the USSR, was signed in 1955 by which five countries?
In the 1950s, Arab countries like Egypt, Syria, Libya, etc, were unhappy with Pakistan because it had joined the Central Treaty Organisation (CENTO) and Southeast Asia Treaty Organisation (SEATO), and entered into a bilateral agreement with the US.
The 1955 Central Treaty Organisation (CENTO) was originally named Middle East Treaty Organisation (METO) and latter modelled on the current Nato formula.
The military aid that we received for being a part of the Southeast Asia Treaty Organisation, the Central Treaty Organisation or the Baghdad Pact did give an artificial boost to the economy and the political support to dictatorial regimes.
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