Casuistry


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Casuistry

1. In law, the act of applying a rule or principle to a theoretical situation in order to see how it holds up.

2. In law, the act of generalizing an unusual situation in order to form a rule or principle based on it.

3. Derogatory, faulty reasoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
The principle of equity, or casuistry that no fixed rule could override the end it served, that every rule (to recall Donne) 'fore-imagines a Reason' on which it is based, remained in place across political divisions and in the Court of Equity itself.
It was with the publication of the Spanish Augustinian canon regular, Martin Azpilcueta's (Doctor Navarrus) Enchiridion, sive Manuale Confessariorum et Poenitentium (1568) that casuistry achieved both ubiquity and methodological coherence.
But i would argue that in the context of Spain, where for all practical purposes high casuistry was born, (9) the impostor Enric Marco's fraud proved uniquely possible.
Philippa Foot (Foot, 1977) accepted casuistry as the decision procedure of virtue ethics and used it to evaluate the difficult issue of euthanasia but once more Jonsen and Toulmin ignored a remarkable contribution to the revival of casuistry.
Alongside the USCC statement, many theologians attempted a casuistry of accommodation that was designed precisely to anticipate the bishops' first concern, not to compromise Catholic teaching.
Moralism, an inordinate, legalistic dependence upon absolute moral codes out of fear of divine judgment, leads to elaborate, complicated casuistry. It appears in Fundamentalism in selected sins, such as abortion and homosexuality.
As Maryks further acknowledges, it is his purpose in this book tenaciously to highlight "the crucial links between early-modern casuistry and ancient rhetoric (especially Ciceronian)" and to underline the fact that the Jesuits came to base "their rhetoric and casuistry on the Ciceronian ...
His Majesty is the president of the Council with the membership of the following Chairman of the Court of Cassation Shaikh Khalifa bin Rashid bin Abdulla Al Khalifa, Attorney General Dr.Ali bin Fadhl bin Ghanem Al Buainain, Chairman of the Sunni Supreme Sharia Court Shaikh Adnan bin Abdullah Al Qattan, Deputy Sheit Supreme Court Shaikh Nasser Ahmed Khalaf Al Asfoor, Judge at the Supreme Court of Civil Appeal Shaikh Mohammed bin Ali Bin Mohammed Al Khalifa, Judge at the Supreme Court of Civil Appeal Isa bin Mubarak Al Ka'abi, Chairman of Legislation and legal casuistry Committee Abdulla bin Hassan Al Buainain, Judge at the Supreme Court of Civil Appeal Saed Hassan Jassim Al Hayki and Lawyer Hameed Habeeb Ahmed.
He practiced casuistry, the "detailed, almost forensic [and, in Boyle's case, apparently obsessive] examination" (2) of the moral and ethical implications of specific actions.
When I told four young scholars in bioethics, their responses were uniform: "The name is familiar, but ..." Two of them recalled that Toulmin was my coauthor on The Abuse of Casuistry. I informed them that Toulmin had a profound influence on the origins of bioethics, even though his engagement with the field was relatively brief.
His failure to distinguish two very different dictionary definitions of the term "casuistry" results in a cavalier dismissal of the entire discipline of moral theology.
The pre-modern approaches are a teleological approach often referred to as virtue ethics and casuistry.