net book value

(redirected from Carrying Values)

Net book value

The current book value of an asset or liability; that is, its original book value net of any accounting adjustments such as depreciation.

Net Book Value

In accounting, an asset's original price minus depreciation and amortization. For example, if a company bought piece of technological equipment for $100,000 with an absolute physical life of ten years and a patent lasting 20 years, one would account the net book value as the original price and subtract $10,000 per year (for depreciation due to reduced physical life) and $5,000 per year (for amortization).

In accounting a company, the net book value is the value of the company's assets minus the value of its liabilities and intangible assets. Put another way, the book value is the shareholders' equity, or how much the company would be worth if it paid of all of its debts and liquidated immediately. It is also known as the written-down value.

net book value

or

written down value

the accounting value of a FIXED ASSET in a firm's BALANCE SHEET that represents its original cost less cumulative DEPRECIATION charged to date.

net book value

the accounting value of a FIXED ASSET in a firm's BALANCE SHEET that represents its original cost less cumulative DEPRECIATION charged to date.
References in periodicals archive ?
In its announcement of 7 June 2013, Newcrest indicated that, based on its estimate of carrying values and the Company s internal indicative valuations, an impairment of the carrying value of assets in the range of A$5 to A$6 billion was likely in the 2013 financial year statutory accounts.
The difference between the carrying values of the other investments (to be displayed on the balance sheet) and the adjusted basis is the accumulated OCI, which is not available to absorb future losses.
For example, if ABC allocated the LIFO reserve based on relative LIFO carrying values, the allocation and revised layers would be computed as follows:
Long-lived assets and identifiable intangibles should be evaluated for impairment if economic events or changes in circumstances indicate their carrying values may not be recoverable.
For example, if an auditor's firm employs an appraiser and decides to use that appraiser as part of its audit staff to evaluate real estate carrying values, SAS no.