Carib

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Related to Caribs: Arawaks, Tainos

Carib

A Tatar unit of area approximately equivalent to 1,821 square meters. It was rendered obsolete when the Soviet Union began to use the metric system in 1924.
References in periodicals archive ?
Point Carib, which is an extension on the "Grand Bay", is also important for fishing and trading of goods by sea.
It was said, as soon as the statue (the same statue that the Caribs of Arima cherish to this day) was completed, the "girl" found in the highwoods disappeared forever.
Caribs are the very people who have given their name to the region.
The island's early colonial history shows visitors were not welcomed by the inhabitants, the fierce Carib Indians, whose name lingers on in the word Caribbean.
He marvels that carib females prefer nectar from green flowers when many hummingbird-pollinated flowers blaze red or orange.
Little is certain about the origin of the Black Caribs, but the first Africans in the Windward Islands--that we know about--were captives taken by the Caribs in raids upon the early Spanish settlements.
The struggle between hunter and hunted reflects the history of the Caribs, their fierce reputation, and eventual conquest by another people.
It will be very bad for the Caribs if the forest is damaged; we rely on it for our waterflow and canoe building', Carib Chief Hilary Frederick says.
Ellis says BHP has established a dialogue with the Caribs to incorporate their concerns and participation into the exploration process.
Carib, like her mother and grandmother before her, is the conscience of the community.
Centring" is the attempt to create order out of chaos - be that the metropolitan centring of a world system of economic exploitation through plantation slavery or the centring of Carib survivors who fled to the east coast of Dominica to reorder their world following the chaos of European contact.
But the collusive mechanisms that shape the rhetoric of this historical narrative force a dissent from contemporary intellectual orthodoxy: like Montaigne, Rochefort calls attention to the flawed methods and narrow conceptions of those authors most responsible for the underserved negative images of Caribs.