capital

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Capital

Capital

Money that one has invested. For example, one uses capital when building a factory to make a new product. Likewise, one uses capital when one buys a single share of a stock. Free flow of capital into investments is thought to be a major component of economic growth. Generally speaking, businesses can only expand when they are able to raise capital from investors or borrow it from a bank or through a bond issue. See also: Capitalization, Capitalism.

Capital.

Capital is money that is used to generate income or make an investment. For example, the money you use to buy shares of a mutual fund is capital that you're investing in the fund.

Companies raise capital from investors by selling stocks and bonds and use the money to expand, make acquisitions, or otherwise build the business.

The term capital markets refers to the physical and electronic environments where this capital is raised, either through public offerings or private placements.

capital

  1. the funds invested in a BUSINESS in order to acquire the ASSETS which the business needs to trade. Capital can consist of SHARE CAPITAL subscribed by SHAREHOLDERS or LOAN CAPITAL provided by lenders.
  2. GOODS such as plant, machinery and equipment which are used to produce other goods and services. See CAPITAL STOCK, INVESTMENT.

capital

the contribution to productive activity made by INVESTMENT in physical capital (for example, factories, offices, machinery, tools) and in HUMAN CAPITAL (for example, general education, vocational training). Capital is one of the three main FACTORS OF PRODUCTION, the other two being LABOUR and NATURAL RESOURCES. Physical (and human) capital make a significant contribution towards ECONOMIC GROWTH. See CAPITAL FORMATION, CAPITAL STOCK, CAPITAL WIDENING, CAPITAL DEEPENING, GROSS FIXED CAPITAL FORMATION, CAPITAL ACCUMULATION.

capital

(1) In architecture, the top part of a column.(2) In finance: (a) All the accumulated goods, possessions, and assets used for the production of income and wealth. (b) The amount invested in business.
References in classic literature ?
It does not become us to trace the steps which she took in the conduct of this most difficult negotiation; but, having shown them to their satisfaction that the sum which she was empowered to offer was all her husband's available capital, and having convinced them that Colonel Crawley would prefer a perpetual retirement on the Continent to a residence in this country with his debts unsettled; having proved to them that there was no possibility of money accruing to him from other quarters, and no earthly chance of their getting a larger dividend than that which she was empowered to offer, she brought the Colonel's creditors unanimously to accept her proposals, and purchased with fifteen hundred pounds of ready money more than ten times that amount of debts.
But it has all the immeasurable advantages that come from long experience, immense bulk, the most highly skilled specialists, and an abundance of capital.
The proletarian is without property; his relation to his wife and children has no longer anything in common with the bourgeois family-relations; modern industrial labour, modern subjection to capital, the same in England as in France, in America as in Germany, has stripped him of every trace of national character.
Whether feeling it necessary to make a sacrifice before abandoning the capital or guided by other, personal considerations, these generals seemed not to understand that this council could not alter the inevitable course of events and that Moscow was in effect already abandoned.
Rothschild; but as my motive in travelling to your capital would not have been for the pleasure of dabbling in stocks, I stayed away till some favorable chance should present itself of carrying my wish into execution.
In biography the truth is every thing, and in autobiography it is especially so -- yet I scarcely hope to be believed when I state, however solemnly, that my poor father put me, when I was about fifteen years of age, into the counting-house of what be termed "a respectable hardware and commission merchant doing a capital bit of business
2) An act of parliament has been since passed by which some breaches of trust have been made capital.