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Capital

Capital

Money that one has invested. For example, one uses capital when building a factory to make a new product. Likewise, one uses capital when one buys a single share of a stock. Free flow of capital into investments is thought to be a major component of economic growth. Generally speaking, businesses can only expand when they are able to raise capital from investors or borrow it from a bank or through a bond issue. See also: Capitalization, Capitalism.

Capital.

Capital is money that is used to generate income or make an investment. For example, the money you use to buy shares of a mutual fund is capital that you're investing in the fund.

Companies raise capital from investors by selling stocks and bonds and use the money to expand, make acquisitions, or otherwise build the business.

The term capital markets refers to the physical and electronic environments where this capital is raised, either through public offerings or private placements.

capital

  1. the funds invested in a BUSINESS in order to acquire the ASSETS which the business needs to trade. Capital can consist of SHARE CAPITAL subscribed by SHAREHOLDERS or LOAN CAPITAL provided by lenders.
  2. GOODS such as plant, machinery and equipment which are used to produce other goods and services. See CAPITAL STOCK, INVESTMENT.

capital

the contribution to productive activity made by INVESTMENT in physical capital (for example, factories, offices, machinery, tools) and in HUMAN CAPITAL (for example, general education, vocational training). Capital is one of the three main FACTORS OF PRODUCTION, the other two being LABOUR and NATURAL RESOURCES. Physical (and human) capital make a significant contribution towards ECONOMIC GROWTH. See CAPITAL FORMATION, CAPITAL STOCK, CAPITAL WIDENING, CAPITAL DEEPENING, GROSS FIXED CAPITAL FORMATION, CAPITAL ACCUMULATION.

capital

(1) In architecture, the top part of a column.(2) In finance: (a) All the accumulated goods, possessions, and assets used for the production of income and wealth. (b) The amount invested in business.
References in periodicals archive ?
Travellers transporting goods along the Grand Canal, which linked the rich revenue-producing provinces of south China to the capital in Beijing, faced armed robbers, extortionists, and swindlers as they passed through the Capital Region.
As the principal capital of the Ming dynasty, Beijing was at the center of the enormous political, ritual, military, and economic resources associated with the throne.
How are we to explain the rampant banditry in the Capital Region during the middle Ming period?
The Veritable Records were imperially compiled annals with almost daily entries, sometimes multiple entries for each day, comprised of reports from officials in the field and in the capital ministries.
Recently banditry in and around the capital has become rampant.
Mounted banditry continued to be a high-profile crime in the capital region during the first quarter of the sixteenth century, with major outbreaks in 1509-1510,1518, and 1521.
If brigands seemed drawn to Beijing proper, they were also active in many of the entrepots surrounding the capital. Located at the northern terminus of the Grand Canal a dozen miles east of Beijing, Tongzhou was a thriving city during the Ming, boasting specialized markets, periodic markets, and inns "everywhere." [29] It was also the site of critical imperial rice granaries that supplied the capital.
For instance, in May of 1466, banditry rendered the roads to Beijing impassable, thus severing the capital's supply of rice and sending grain prices spiralling.
In response, imperial military personnel were dispatched: four commanders, chiliarchs, and centurions from the capital were each given 30 skilled cavalry troops to patrol trouble spots around Liangxiang.
It is very likely that less savory members of the Capital Region were also attracted to the excitement of the Medicine King Temple fair.
Gangs of young toughs and beggars were frequently encountered, [38] and are variously reported to have beaten people, extorted goods, swindled merchants and travellers, and even to have seized grain shipments from soldiers delivering rice to the capital. [39]
An October report of 1471 gives some indication of the difficulties in transporting goods to the capital. When the Grand Canal froze during the winter months, those delivering grain and goods from the south were forced to resort to overland delivery.