Capitalist

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Capitalist

A person who believes in or is involved with an economic system in which the means of production are privately held. In capitalism, the most important of the means of production is money, rather than land (as in feudalism) or labor (as in socialism). That is, the ability to raise and use money for the production of goods and services is more important than owning the land from which goods come, or the ability to work in order to create a good or service. As a result, government policies generally target the regulation (or not) of money and its uses rather than those of property and/or labor. While capitalism is often associated with laissez-faire policies, governments in capitalist countries often involve themselves. The appropriate amount of government intervention in a capitalist system remains hotly debated.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is a notorious Fact that, under the capitalist system, abundance is punished, and scarcity is rewarded; so much so that an economic recession may occur simply because people have produced too much of the good things of this world.
The success of capitalism has raised the standard of living of the mass of the population in capitalist countries.
But if the demand required to generate a profit could not come from the workers, Luxemburg was equally adamant it could not come from capitalists either.
The former devoted capitalists comprise the Washington State Investment Board, the Oregon Public Employees Retirement Fund, and the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation.
[the capitalists'] activities as suppliers of present goods in exchange for interest return, therefore, are not really completed with their purchase of factors.
The monetarist macroeconomic policies were costly for the capitalists as well.
The study will focus upon Ghose's portrayal of the socio-political reality from the Marxist perspective, the impact of the alliance between the ruling elite and the capitalists to the detriment of the ordinary people and the country itself.
"The capitalists, particularly the US launch production lines that do not comply with the environment.
Quite often, venture capitalists from mature markets see tremendous opportunities in emerging markets and feel they can parachute in and make successful investments.
These funds have a limited life and, given that a sizeable deal takes a similar amount of time and effort as a smaller one, venture capitalists tend to focus on larger investments.
He narrowed his search for financing to venture capitalists who understood the problem of information technology management and had serious questions for him about solving those challenges.
Their international policies were different from those of contemporary capitalist states.