Capitalist


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Capitalist

A person who believes in or is involved with an economic system in which the means of production are privately held. In capitalism, the most important of the means of production is money, rather than land (as in feudalism) or labor (as in socialism). That is, the ability to raise and use money for the production of goods and services is more important than owning the land from which goods come, or the ability to work in order to create a good or service. As a result, government policies generally target the regulation (or not) of money and its uses rather than those of property and/or labor. While capitalism is often associated with laissez-faire policies, governments in capitalist countries often involve themselves. The appropriate amount of government intervention in a capitalist system remains hotly debated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because his sole aim is to make profit, the capitalist is completely indifferent to any project which has no prospect of yielding profit now or in the not too distant future.
Capitalists have to compete for the accumulation of capital.
For example, we now have money circuit theory, such as in the works of Augusto Grazziani, which asserts that credit is essential to capitalist production.
Much of Capitalist Globalization is focused on this area of the world.
This is because the MVP and hence DMVP of a factor are not given to the capitalist but instead must be estimated through entrepreneurial appraisement (Rothbard, 2009, p.
In other words, Cuba's new worker cooperatives will operate pretty much along the same lines as their successful cousins in the capitalist world, including Spain's Mondragon Cooperative Corporation.
Ghose shows the true face of capitalism and rejects the capitalist ideology of being the bringer of prosperity and happiness.
Last year, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad also took the capitalist powers responsible for the growing trend of environmental pollution across the world.
In Chapter 2, the author presents the simultaneous mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion involved in the capitalist system that might be traceable in archaeological records.
A question that emerges from the story of Swan River, and from the early years of the other Australian colonies further east, is whether a land lacking virtually any 'doubly free' labour should be considered part of the capitalist mode of production.
They cover the origins and development of the global capitalist economy, the Great Recession and the US as the epicenter of global capitalist crisis, the debt-crisis in Europe and how Greece is situated at its center, the rise of China and its impact on global capitalist crises, and the movement toward socialism in the 21st century.
Capitalist Solutions: A Philosophy of American Moral Dilemmas argues that the U.S.