Sangam

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Sangam

An ancient Indian unit of area approximately equivalent to one-quarter hectare.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arguing that the akam landscapes (tinai) of Cankam poetry derive from Sanskritic music theory as most prominently expressed in the Natyasastra, Herman Tieken continues his attempt to demonstrate that Tamil's Cankam literature "is not as early or as independent as it is often claimed to be" (p.
I believe the essay might have been better served by not using Pollock as the continual purvapaksa: the direct links Francis asserts between Cankam literature, Nantikkalampakam, and the Cola meykkirtis (p.
Cankam literature is an imprecise but common term for the earliest, classical poetry in Old Tamil and the corresponding texts of grammar and poetics.
cankam literature, cankamalso spelled sangamThe earliest writings in Tamil, thought to have been produced in three cankams, or literary academies, in Madurai, India, from the 1st to the 4th century AD.
Schmid then turns to the god Murukan and his appearances in Tamil cankam literature. The important point in Schmid's analysis is just how the conflation of Skanda with the Tamil god Murukan might have come about, and it is all about similarities.
In "Cankam Literature and Its Public," Gros describes the "two publics" of cankam literature; at the moment of its composition and its readers through history (p.
Given both the aesthetic focus of classical Tamil poetics (the so-called Cankam literature) on five distinct tinai or landscape motifs and the well-documented insistence on local sites in early Tamil Saiva and Vaisnava devotional poetry, the literary imagining of space and place clearly plays an important role in Tamil Geographies.
Rajan to size up cankam literature against the archaeological record.
Nachimuthu also makes some interesting remarks about the trajectories of cankam Tamil's linguistic heritage, demonstrating precisely how cankam forms are retained in Malayalam, but not in Kannada or Telugu, finally making the claim that cankam literature should be regarded as "proto-Dravidian" literature, and not as literature that exclusively belongs to Tamil, reminding us of Old Tamil's geographical and linguistic reach.
A basic, even indispensable, source for both authors and texts ranging from Cankam literature to approximately the middle of the twentieth century, it attempts to include in each entry also the bibliographic reference necessary for further research.
xiv) of articles covering topics from Brahmi inscriptions and Cankam literature to bhakti poetry and the history of tobacco use in southern India.
With regard to literary studies, the analyses by Mahadevan and others have provided historical corroboration for various persons mentioned in the Tamil Cankam literature (see, e.g., pp.