Condor

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Related to California condors: Gymnogyps californianus

Condor

Applies to derivative products. Option strategy consisting of both puts and calls at different strike prices to capitalize on a narrow range of volatility. The payoff diagram takes the shape of a bird.

Condor

In options, a strategy in which four contracts are bought or sold at four different strike prices. In a call condor, the investor buys the calls with the highest and lowest strike prices and sells the calls with the middle strike prices. In a put condor, the investor sells the contracts with the highest and lowest strikes and buys the middle ones. An investor engages in a condor strategy if he/she expects a great deal of volatility on the underlying asset; it allows him/her to make a profit regardless of the price of the underlying as long as it remains in a certain (broad) range. See also: Butterfly spread.
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Both of those efforts helped save the California condor, a vulture native to the western U.S.
The California condor is North America's largest land bird, with a wingspan of 9.5 feet.
Given the lack of far-reaching action at the federal level, California legislatures have adopted a mandatory lead ban approach, primarily driven by the program to reintroduce California condors to the wild in the state.
(http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1650/CONDOR-17-48.1) The paper is titled "Feasibility of California Condor recovery in northern California, USA: Contaminants in surrogate Turkey Vultures and Common Ravens."
Caption: Below left: California condors; below right: Flowers along the Condor Trail near Big Sur
Yet, 30 years later, some still debate those decisions and the future direction of the California condor recovery program.
Now California condors number more than 400 counting both wild and captive birds.
Ammunition is the principal source of lead accumulated by California condors re-introduced to the wild.
The California condor's return to flying free in the wild after a close brush with extinction may be an illusory recovery.
The bill, known as the Ridley-Tree Condor Preservation Act, was enacted after scientists and environmental groups determined endangered California condors were dying after ingesting bullet fragments from gut piles left by hunters.
That's why the next stop is Arizona, where NPCA and Defenders of Wildlife are hoping to push for similar legislation to protect California condors reestablishing territory in the Grand Canyon.
By the late 1980s the last 27 California condors in existence were living at either the San Diego Zoo or the Los Angeles Zoo.

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