Donor

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Related to Cadaveric Donor: cadaveric transplant

Donor

One who gives property or assets to someone else through the vehicle of a trust.

Donor

A person or institution who gives assets to another person or institution, either directly or through a trust. Under most circumstances, donors can deduct the value (or depreciated value) of the assets given from their taxable income. While many donors give out of the goodness of their hearts, many do so in order to avoid taxes, especially when donating through a trust.

donor

One who gives a gift.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although living persons donate kidneys, cadaveric donors are the main source of solid organs for transplantation.
Experience has shown that recipients receiving organs from emotionally-related donors have a higher graft survival rate than do those recipients receiving organs from cadaveric donors and, in the case of kidney transplant recipients, do as well as recipients receiving kidneys from a parent (UNOS, 2002).
AS FAMILY PRACTICE NEWS reported, the use of cadaveric kidneys from subjects over age 55 years is controversial, because graft survival is inferior when compared with the results achieved with kidney transplants from conventional cadaveric donors.
Currently two procedures and two cadaveric donors are necessary to achieve this level.
Archibald noted that each year, about 18,000 cadaveric donors provide 650,000 allografts for transplantation-frequently cartilage for joint surgeries.
UMC recovered 45 solid organs from 14 different cadaveric donors during our fiscal period ending in 2000.
Subjects: A total of 1946 renal transplant were performed from 1537 living and 409 cadaveric donors between January 2003 and June 2014 in our center.
In 2014, five cadaveric donors made nine transplants possible, the minister said, and there were also 22 transplants from living donors.
The product can also be used to test plasma and serum to screen organ and tissue donors, including cadaveric donors.
Blacks desiring transplantation are, for poorly defined reasons, less likely than whites to have a suitable living donor and are relatively more dependent on the availability of cadaveric donors.
The most widely used orthopedic transplantation technique, allograft tissue, comes from two sources: living donors undergoing primary joint replacements or cadaveric donors.
Unlike cadaveric donors (CDs) where the functional value of the organ to the donor is small, LDs must consider the potential long-term healthcare costs associated with donating an organ.