CNN Effect


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CNN Effect

A theory stating that the market suffers during intense news coverage of a major event because persons stay home and watch the coverage, rather than go out and buy goods and services. This is a controversial theory and little evidence documents it. However, its effect, if any, would likely impact services more negatively than goods. For example, watching a natural disaster on television may prevent one from going to the cinema and watching a film about a natural disaster. It will not, however, prevent one from buying groceries. More generally, the CNN effect refers to the idea that 24-hour cable news has given the public the impression, but not necessarily a correct one, that it is more engaged with current events.
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The famous 'CNN effect' explains the significance of the media's influence on a state's policies particularly in conflict prevention and egalitarian interventions.
Some attribute enormous power to the news media (the so-called CNN effect) while others claim the media 'manufactures consent' for elite policy preferences.
As such, it echoes research on the CNN effect. Indeed, it is worth recalling such research now.
Finally, while they find some support for the idea of an international two-step flow, they-along with others-question the validity of the CNN effect in terms of media impact on political figures and public policy.
67); and explanations of concepts such as the 'CNN effect', framing theory and the Habermasian public sphere.
In anii '80, rolul social al jurnalistilor si impactul civilizator al informatiei a culminat in ceea ce studiile numesc "the myth of the CNN effect".
Remember the CNN Effect? Back when the first cable news network had the field to itself, scholars used to argue about its impact on foreign policy.
Unfortunately the "CNN effect," bringing world attention to an emergency, only comes when it is far too late to take preventive steps and often too late even for effective remedial ones.
The Kuwaiti invasion, and the perceived threat to Saudi Arabian oil supplies, sends gasoline prices higher, but, perhaps of equal concern to retailers, keeps their customers indoors, glued to their television sets in an obsessive state that comes to be known as "the CNN effect." The first U.S.
Various ways this might be done are explored, one of which is the "CNN effect," the "impact that 24-hour rolling news services ...