Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States

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Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States

Also called CFIUS. An interagency group in the United States responsible for advising the president on how foreign investment affects the U.S. It consists of the heads of 16 departments and agencies and is chaired by the Secretary of the Treasury. Among other things, it is responsible for ensuring that foreign direct investment does not negatively impact U.S. national security. It was established by executive order in 1975. See also: Exon-Florio Amendment.
References in periodicals archive ?
And several other technology deals fell apart, after CFIUS raised concerns.
The CFIUS is overloaded and takes a long time to rule on deals, Scissors said.
CFIUS has approved almost all proposed Chinese investments but a handful of high-profile rejections have made potential Chinese investors skittish.
Contemporary CFIUS Procedures: Attracting Inward Investment While Avoiding National Security Threats
Syngenta's share price has significantly lagged ChemChina's offer amid concerns that the deal would get through CFIUS.
In a two-hour live Webcast, a panel of distinguished professionals and thought leaders assembled by The Knowledge Group will provide the audience with an in depth review and discussion of the recent updates and the latest trends and insights with regards to foreign investments under CFIUS and FINSA in 2016.
CFIUS is an interagency committee meant to review and approve mergers and acquisitions of companies that have a relation, however tangential, to national security.
In a press statement last week, Stabenow said the "private and secretive" nature of the CFIUS review process of foreign acquisitions raises serious questions about what factors are taken into consideration when undergoing evaluation.
It's kind of the perfect storm of issues," said Anne Salladin, a former Treasury Department official who worked on CFIUS reviews and is now at Stroock & Stroock & Lavan in Washington.
In addition, anecdotal evidence seemed to indicate that the CFIUS process was not market neutral.
The United States reviews most investments for national security implications with its Committee on Foreign Investment, chaired by the Department of Treasury, and Ziad Haider, attorney and writer, argues Chinese companies fare better than most would assume: "The volume and sophistication of Chinese firms looking to enter the US market is growing: CFIUS filings by Chinese investors more than doubled between 2011 and 2012, from ten to 23.