Buyer's Fee

Buyer's Fee

In an auction, a fee paid by the purchaser to the person or organization holding the auction on top of the top bid. For example, if one bids $1,000 for an antique bed, one may have to pay a 10% buyer's fee (or $100) if one wins the auction. A buyer's fee is one way an auctioneer makes money from the auction.
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Here are the six restomod Corvettes that sold for at least $300,000 at Barrett-Jackson (prices include 10 percent buyer's fee).
Other than a small initial set up fee, there are no sellers fees or monthly fees for the franchise dealer and the buyer's fee is 200 percent lower than industry average.'
Winners also have to a pay a buyer's fee, which helps fund the auction.
The coin is in pristine condition, and the final sale price includes a 15 percent buyer's fee.
This opinion was given more credence in the March 16, 2010, James Julia Auction, in which a cased pair of Boutet flintlock pistols sold for $437,000, including the 15 percent buyer's fee. The pistols' 123/4-inch barrels are heavily decorated with gold.
Bear in mind the extra costs - a buyer's fee and any storage fee you may have to pay if you can't pick the motor up immediately.
He paid pounds 2,700 for the car and paid the auction house a pounds 137 buyer's fee.
In addition, the 10 percent buyer's fee -- an additional $100,000 -- was donated to the American Heart Association.
The vast majority of the timepieces available on DirectBid will be affordable and the buyer's fee will be competitively low, appealing to new clients as well as to collectors.
The marketplace is void of mandatory fees such as "Final Sales Fees" or "Buyer's Fees".
London, March 18 (ANI): Kate Middleton's see-through dress, which she wore at a charity fashion show at St Andrews University, has been sold for 65,000 pounds plus 13,000 pounds buyer's fees.